We are citizens: A place to begin to talk about our membership in the world #pb10for10 2018

Picture book 10 for 10 is here!  This is one of the best days of the year to share picture book love and to increase your knowledge of picture book titles.

This celebration of picture books is hosted by Cathy from Reflect and Refine: Building a Learning Community and Mandy from Enjoy and Embrace Learning. Thanks to both of them for the work they do to promote this wonderful day of picture book sharing!

This is my 7th year participating in this event. In 2012, I shared ten beloved titles. In 2013, I went with a theme: Connections across the generations. In 2014, I shared ten “go to” titles on various themes like generosity, courage and forgiveness. In 2015. I highlighted favourite historical fiction titles. In 2016 I chose books that may inspire philosophical discussion.Last year my list included 10 titles I described as beautifully quirky.

This year my list reflects my thinking about how I want picture books to support our discussions and thoughts about what it means to be a citizen – in our classroom, in our communities, in this world. When we look up the word citizen in the dictionary, there is a lot in the definition about being an inhabitant, a member of a group or society and about having certain legal and protected rights. In basic definitions, there isn’t much included about responsibilities to others.  I am wanting to begin to explore the idea of our global citizenship – beginning with who we are and how we treat others and getting ready to think about who we are in the world. What are all of our rights? What are our responsibilities?

How do we treat those around us? How do we develop our capacity to understand our role in a bigger world?

When I started to research definitions of global citizenship, I found many words and ideas that spoke to what I want to explore and foster in our classroom this year.

What is global citizenship? Who is a global citizen?

“An ethic of care for the world.”  Hannah Arendt

“It is a way of living that recognizes our world is an increasingly complex web of connections and interdependencies. One in which our choices and actions may have repercussions for people and communities locally, nationally or internationally.” From the IDEAS for Global Citizenship website

” . . . someone who sees himself or herself as being part of an emerging world community and whose actions help define this community’s values and practices.” from The Global Citizens’ Initiative website

I teach primary students and believe that these children are fully capable of examining and talking about world issues. But we need to begin with the immediate  (ourselves) and examine how we interact in the specific world around us. These conversations will allow us to begin looking further to talk about our connections globally.

More books will come. A lot more books. But we will begin here.

We will read They All Saw a Cat by Brendan Wenzel to remind ourselves that we all view things from different perspectives and that these perspectives are shaped by our experiences and our feelings of comfort and fear.

We will read Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth by Oliver Jeffers to remind ourselves that we share this planet with a huge variety of people and other living things and that we can be awed by the amazing but that we are also bound by responsibilities to care for all inhabitants of this Earth.

We will read Why Am I Me? written by Paige Britt and illustrated by Sean Qualls and Selina Alko to explore questions about our personal identity and to celebrate our diversity and connection.

We will read Because Amelia Smiled by David Ezra Stein to understand that kindness is not only contagious but that kindness passed on grows and strengthens.

We will read When we Were Alone written by David A. Robertson and illustrated by Julie Flett to honour personal histories and to talk about resilience. Our history connects us just as deeply as our present. Experiences continue to shape relationships and identity.

We will read Desmond and the Very Mean Word written by Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Douglas Carlton Abrams and illustrated by A.G. Ford to remind ourselves to forgive and that we may need help practicing forgiveness.

We will read The Rooster Who Would Not Be Quiet! by Carmen Agra Deedy and illustrated by Eugene Yelchin so that we can talk about how our voices cannot be silenced and the incredible power of speaking up.

We will read Julián is a Mermaid by Jessica Love to talk about self expression and to remind ourselves “that anyone can be anything they want to be,” (as one of my students explained this year after hearing this book)

We will read The Boy and the Whale by Mordicai Gerstein so that we can talk about helping and protecting wildlife as we go about our lives and interactions. This book will allow us to talk about how courage is in doing what you know is right even when you are told not to do it.

We will read I Walk with Vanessa: A Story about a Simple Act of Kindness by Kerascoët to witness what it is to be an upstander. Because we know when we witness something that is wrong and there are all kinds of ways to respond.

Follow along on twitter using the #pb10for10 hashtag. All posts will be linked on the Google Community Site for Picture Book 10 for 10

pb-10-for-10What titles would you add to this list?

Happy picture book reading!  

Monday December 11th, 2017

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

Sharing reading and learning from the past 2 weeks.

Each week I share at least one reading photo of the week. I love this photo of Ms. B who works in my classroom (and her helpful page turning assistant) reading a book to a group of avid listeners.

Proud Mama and new reader of the chapter book series Heidi Hecklebeck. These moments 🙂

Our #classroombookaday titles last week were all about persistence and working to solve a problem.

This week we highlighted sibling relationships.

I loved reading student writing about these books.

Again, we noticed the importance of persistence!

Classroom Highlights 

My Monday posts now also contain some sharing from our week in the classroom.

We did counting collections this week and used lots of spaces and containers to count a myriad of things: seashells, buttons, bread ties, bottle caps, etc.

As we have explored addition and subtraction equations with unknown numbers we have used numerous materials including Cuisenairre rods, unifex cubes and number charts to help us visualize and represent problems.

We did lots of learning in these past two weeks and lots of playful explorations with our classmates. So much creativity is expressed through play.

In case you missed it – I have compiled my list of gift book recommendations for 2017: 25 amazing titles! Read about them here.

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

Books I enjoyed:

The Boy and the Whale by Mordicai Gerstein

One boy. One whale tangled in a fishing net. Should the boy disobey his father and risk potential danger to save the whale? Such a story.

Sleep Tight Farm: A Farm Prepares for Winter written by Eugenie Doyle and illustrated by Becca Stadtlander

Such interesting details and routines are involved in putting a farm to bed for the winter. A family works together to complete each important chore.

Fox’s Garden by Princesse Camcam

A breathtaking wordless title.

You’re All Kinds of Wonderful by Nancy Tillman

A celebration of finding our gifts and honouring what is unique about each of us.

Give Bees a Chance by Bethany Barton

What a fun way to learn about bees! Follow along as a reluctant bee enthusiast becomes convinced of the wonder and importance of bees. Entertaining and informative! A must have for school and classroom libraries.

Things to Do by Elaine Magliaro and illustrated by Catia Chien

Read to celebrate the wonder of the world. Use as a mentor text for poetry writing. This book will be read again and again. So excited it is now part of our classroom collection.

Chasing Augustus by Kimberly Newton Fusco

I adored Fusco’s earlier middle grade novel Beholding Bee and have now met another memorable character in Rosie. After her Dad has a stroke, Rosie finds herself living with a grandfather ill prepared for a granddaughter. She also finds herself without her loveable dog Augustus. Determined to find him and bring him home, Rosie battles the world.

Up next? I am reading The Last Fifth Grade of Emerson Elementary by Laura Shovan

Monday January 25th, 2016

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

Each week I share a reading photo of the week. I haven’t blogged for a while so I will share a few . . .

Here we are pointing to titles we would like to read after participating in a book sharing circle.

IMWAYR There's a Book for That

Buddy reading moments are amazing to capture.

IMWAYR There's a Book for That

This story is a special one. These two are taking turns reading aloud to each other. At the beginning of the year, one student read and one listened. Now they both have the skills to share in the oral reading together. A beautiful supportive reading experience that I was thrilled to capture.

IMWAYR There's a Book for That

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

IMWAYR 2015

On the blog:

I have been absent from this blog for just over a week (illness, busy, stuff . . . ) so just one post to share:

Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: Whose Hands are these? 

Books I enjoyed:

Rufus the Writer written by Elizabeth Bram and illustrated by Chuck Groenink

What a very special title. It’s all about stories and creativity so it’s an automatic wow. But, what I love most is that the stories are so accessible. They whisper to children, “You could do this too . . . come on, try!”

Rufus the Writer IMWAYR There's a Book for That

If I had a Million Onions by Sheree Fitch, with illustrations by Yayo

Fun, wonderful poetry! Fitch is a master of word play!

If I had a Million Onions

Dear Hot Dog by Mordicai Gerstein 

I love both the illustrations and the poetry here. Poems that are ode to everyday things. Toothbrushes, drinking cups, the rain and of course hot dogs.

Dear Hot Dog

Sing a Season Song written by Jane Yolen with illustrations by Lisel Jane Ashlock

A gorgeous lyrical title about the seasons. The illustrations have a timeless feel – like they could have been lifted from a book of fine art.

Sing a Season Song

Fat Angie by E.E. Charlton-Trujillo

This book is “issue-y” What doesn’t it address? It hits almost everything. Self harm, dysfunctional relationships, bullying, grief, young romance, self-worth . . . I was a little bit irked by “teenage speak” because really, do people talk like that? Maybe . . . Thank god I’m old. But there were many powerful, heart wrenching pages which make it a title well worth reading.

Fat Angie by E.E. Charlton-Trujillo

2016 Chapter Book Challenge: 3/75 complete

Goodreads Challenge: 26/400 books read

#MustReadin2016: 3/30 complete

Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge: 8/100 titles

Diverse Books in 2015: 3/50 books read

Next up? I continue reading More Happy than Not by Adam Silvera and have almost finished reading A Night Divided by Jennifer Nielsen aloud to my family. We are all addicted! Just a few more chapters!

Mock Caldecott 2016

Oh this process is a tricky one – deciding on the most beautiful of the beautiful. This year I am sharing twelve titles with my students. But if I could include Canadian illustrators, I would have fifteen titles here. Check out the bottom of the post for books from Canadian illustrators that I would love to include.

I LOVED this experience last year. Read about Mock Caldecott 2015 here and here.

This year I am extremely excited to go through this process again with my new class. I will use the same 3 questions I used with my grade 3/4 class but I have simplified the language a little bit to be more appropriate for this group of Grade 2/3 students.. Students answer each question for each book with a rating of 1 – 5,

This book is a book kids will really like. 1  2  3  4  5

The illustrations in this book are excellent. 1  2  3  4  5

The illustrations are a great fit for the story.  1  2  3  4  5

Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

Here are the twelve titles on our Mock Caldecott 2016 list. Listed alphabetically by illustrator (as they would be shelved on last year’s Caldecott Honor artist Lauren Castillo‘s picture book shelves 🙂 )

Water is Water: A Book About the Water Cycle written by Miranda Paul and illustrated by Jason Chin

Water Is Water- A Book About the Water Cycle Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

Special Delivery written by Phllip C. Stead and illustrated by Matthew Cordell

Special Delivery Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

The Night World by Mordicai Gerstein

The Night World Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

The Skunk written by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Patrick McDonnell

The Skunk Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

Float by Daniel Miyares

Float Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

My Pen by Christopher Myers 

My Pen Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

Wolfie the Bunnie written by Ame Dyckman and illustrated by Zachariah Ohora

Wolfie the Bunnie Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

Emmanuel’s Dream: The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah written by Laurie Ann Thompson and illustrated by Sean Qualls

Emmanuel's Dream- The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña and illustrated by Christian Robinson

Market Street Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

The Bear Ate Your Sandwich by Julia Sarcone-Roach 

The Bear Ate Your Sandwich Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

Lenny and Lucy written by Philip C. Stead and illustrated by Erin E. Stead

Lenny & Lucy Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

The Whisper by Pamela Zagarenski

The Whisper Mock Caldecott 2016 There's a Book for That

These Canadian OMG titles are not to be missed when we are doing illustration swooning of the best of the best kind. Unfortunately, these are not eligible for the Caldecott medal.

Ask Me written by Bernard Waber and illustrated by Suzy Lee

Ask Me Bernard Waber Suzy Lee

This is Sadie written by Sara O’Leary and illustrated by Julie Morstad

This is Sadie

Sidewalk Flowers by JonArno Lawson and Sydney Smith

sidewalk flowers

Which titles would you include for Mock Caldecott 2016?

Wrapped up in shades of black and grey

It is November and that means it is Picture Book Month!

Here in B.C. we have been experiencing some dark, rainy days. Daylight savings means we just found an extra hour of light in the morning but our afternoons disappear into evening black far too soon. Yet darkness is not all about doom and gloom. It also means cozy, long stretches to read or bustle about inside. Darkness can pull us together for seasons of celebration and special events or provide us with solitude for introspection and calm. Bright is beautiful but so is dark. Whether we seek out the mystery and unexpected or the opportunity to settle into the quiet.

All of the dark has got me thinking about picture book covers. I started a list to see if I could come up with a number of titles that come specially wrapped in blacks and greys. My list ran off the page and I realized that many of my favourite books reside here. Is it just me or is there a certain elegance to these titles?

When you need a break from the bright, pick up one of these beautiful books.

25 titles to swoon over.

Wrapped up in Shades of Black and Grey There's a Book for That

Listed alphabetically by author.

Leo a Ghost Story written by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Christian Robinson

Flashlight by Lizi Boyd

Gleam and Glow written by Eve Bunting and illustrated by Peter Sylvada

A Good Night Walk by Elisha Cooper

The Black Book of Colors written by Menana Cottin and illustrated by Rosana Faría

Nighttime Ninja written by Barbara DaCosta and illustrated by Ed Young

Willaboughy and the Moon by Greg Foley

The Night World by Mordicai Gerstein

The Rabbit Problem by Emily Gravett

Little Mouse’s Big Book of Fears by Emily Gravett

I Know a Bear by Mariana Ruiz Johnson

This is not my Hat by Jon Klassen

In the Tree House written by Andrew Larsen and illustrated by Dušan Petričić 

Sidewalk Flowers by JonArno Lawson and Sydney Smith

Night Animals by Gianna Marino

Zero by Kathryn Otoshi

Our King has Horns! written by Richard Pevear and illustrated by Robert Rayevsky

Big Bad Bubble written by Adam Rubin and illustrated by Daniel Salmieri

The Dark written by Lemony Snicket and illustrated by Jon Klassen

Swan written by Laurel Synder and illustrated by Julie Morstad

Hoot Owl: Master of Disguise written by Sean Taylor and illustrated by Jean Jullien

Friends by Mies van Hout 

Happy by Mies van Hout

Surprise by Mies van Hout 

Ten Birds by Cybele Young

How I love sharing picture book lists during this month of picture book love!

Happy Picture Book Reading!

pb month logo

Picture Book Wishlist: July 2015

Summer time is a lovely time for picture book dreaming. Don’t you think?

Last year at this time, book shopping was not a possibility for me due to a very lengthy teacher’s strike here in B.C. I am now happily back into my book purchasing groove but even us book lovers must prioritize. Unfortunately, I don’t have access to unlimited book buying funds.

Yet, these titles are calling to me! So I thought I would celebrate them in a list. Hopefully, these books will be able to make it into my classroom collection because I can’t wait to share them with students.

 Picture Book Dreaming Wish List July 2015 There's a Book for That

Shared by publication date:

Float by Daniel Miyares (June 2015)

Wordless and wonderful. Themes of discovery, persistence, problem solving and creative thinking. And simply beautiful. I would love to add this title to my wordless book collection.

Float  Picture Book Dreaming Wish List July 2015 There's a Book for That

The Night World by Mordicai Gerstein (June 2015)

This is truly brilliant. A dark, usually known world, is busy and alive when it is explored at night. Slowly, morning happens. And wow, does it happen beautifully. All about the magic of light.

The Night World  Picture Book Dreaming Wish List July 2015 There's a Book for That

To the Sea by Cale Atkinson (June 2015)

Teachers are always looking for amazing books that explore all there is to explore about friendship. Everywhere I turn there is book love for this title. I can’t wait to find it.

To the Sea  Picture Book Dreaming Wish List July 2015 There's a Book for That

First Grade Dropout written by Audrey Vernick and illustrated by Matthew Cordell  (July 2015)

I have read some wonderful reviews of this title (here and here) that have convinced me that this book needs to be in my collection. Intense emotions, Humiliation. Moving forward. Compassion and community. All of these are themes to explore in a primary classroom.

First Grade Dropout  Picture Book Dreaming Wish List July 2015 There's a Book for That

Ask Me written by Bernard Waber and illustrated by Suzy Lee (July 2015)

I read this beautiful review of this title on the blog What to Read to your Kids and I knew I had to own it. I too am a fan of Waber and Lee but I am completely smitten with stories that portray little moments of family relationship.

Ask Me Bernard Waber Suzy Lee  Picture Book Dreaming Wish List July 2015 There's a Book for That

The Little Gardener by Emily Hughes (August 2015)

When I first read Emily Hughes‘ Wild (a library copy) aloud to my class, I admitted that I really loved the book and wished I had a copy for our classroom. One child remarked: “You really should buy it. Otherwise, you might go a little crazy.” Wise words 🙂 Wild is now a beloved book that I own. The pages I have peeked at on various blogs make it very obvious that I must also bring The Little Gardener into my collection.

The Little Gardener  Picture Book Dreaming Wish List July 2015 There's a Book for That

The Tea Party in the Woods by Akiko Miyakoshi (August 2015)

I love fairytales and stories with nuances of fairytale elements. But . . . I am very particular. I find that I either love these titles or I find them barely mediocre. My students are always asking me to purchase more fairy tale stories for our collection and I want to find them the best. From the reviews I have read, this will be a title I will happily add to our growing collection.

 The Ta Party in the Woods  Picture Book Dreaming Wish List July 2015 There's a Book for That

Leo a Ghost Story written by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Christian Robinson (August 2015)

I love the whole idea of this book. We don’t often meet ghosts in picture books. But many children believe they are out there. I love books that celebrate imagination and big believing. And also – Mac Barnett! Christian Robinson! No need to say more.

Leo a Ghost Story  Picture Book Dreaming Wish List July 2015 There's a Book for That

Lenny & Lucy written by Philip C. Stead and illustrated by Erin E. Stead (October 2015)

I think Erin Stead is one of the most talented illustrators out there. Off the charts, can’t quite believe it, oh my, oh my, talented. When the brilliant Stead duo do their thing, I need to own the book. It’s that simple.

Lenny & Lucy  Picture Book Dreaming Wish List July 2015 There's a Book for That

Beyond the Pond by Joseph Kuefler  (October 2015)

I am hearing lovely book buzz about this title. Reviews contain words like imagination, curiosity, magic . . . Sounds delightful!

Beyond the Pond  Picture Book Dreaming Wish List July 2015 There's a Book for ThatWhat picture books are you dreaming of? 

Monday July 13th 2015

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

I have been sharing a reading photo of the week each week. Now that it is summer and I am not surrounded every day with little readers, what can I do? Choose favourite, not yet shared moments of course! Here is one of my avid readers sharing her love for author Robert Munsch. She told me.

“I love Robert Munsch. And I love cookies. Who doesn’t love Robert Munsch? And cookies?”

Good question. 🙂

From the classroom 2014/2015 archives:

Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

imwayr

Busy, busy with book lists! In case you are interested:

In the world of books: 25 boys who stand out

In the world of books: 25 girls who stand out

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Hyped Books I’ve Never Read

Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A Fascination with Nests and Eggs

I dis some amazing picture book reading this week! Some of my favourites:

Pool by JiHyeon Lee

Gorgeous. Wordless. Two children dive deep and meet under a bunch of swimmers and floaters in a busy pool. What do they find there? A fantastical world. I had to purchase this one. I love the colours, the negative space, the whimsy.

Pool Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

Book written by David Miles and illustrated by Natalie Hoopes 

A book about the magic of books. Celebrating all things @booklove Yes, please.

Book Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

The Night World by Mordicai Gerstein

This is truly brilliant. A dark, usually known world, is busy and alive when it is explored at night. Slowly, morning happens. And wow, does it happen beautifully. All about the magic of light.

The Night World Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

I Yam a Donkey by Cece Bell

Super silly. Can’t wait to read this aloud!

I yam a Donkey Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

In the Village by the Sea written by Muon Van and illustrated by April Chu

A Vietnamese family. A small house.A cricket. A certain kind of magic. I recommend experiencing this title.There is so much to it I want to reread it again and again and then share it with children. Simple but yet complex.

In a Village by the Sea Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

Chengdu could not, would not fall asleep by Barney Saltzberg

Wow these illustrations. For panda lovers, this is adorable.

Chengdu could not, would not fall asleep Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

What If . . . ? by Anthony Browne

Worries about attending a birthday party. A big imagination. Full of fantasy and emotion.

What If . . . Anthony Browne Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

The Day the Crayons Came Home written by Drew Daywalt and illustrated by Oliver Jeffers

I was lucky to get a sneak peek at an advanced reader copy of this title at my local book store. Hilarious. Hilarious. Hilarious. I laughed out loud multiple times. Mark down August 18th on your calendar and rush out and buy this book from your favourite local book store!

thedaythecrayonscamehome Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

The Bear Who Shared by Catherine Rayner

Sweet story by Catherine Rayner. How I love her illustrations.

Bear who Shared Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

I Will Take a Nap by Mo Willems

An over tired Gerald really needs a nap. As always, so funny.

elephant and piggie I will Take a Nap Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

And I finished two novels.

The Paper Cowboy written by Kristin Levine

Levine is such a story teller. This title is a challenging read. Our main character Tommy struggles with his own actions and his mother’s unpredictable rage. Guilt, fear, anxiety, pride – so many feelings. So many themes in this historical fiction title: bullying, friendship, family dynamics, community, sibling relationships . . .

The Paper Cowboy Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

Lost in the Sun written by Lisa Graff

What a concept for a book. What is life after you accidentally kill someone? (freak accident) Now there is a big question! Somehow, this title answers it. A book about a young boy lost. Dealing with family. Making friends. Being really angry. Moving on. And how much do I love the character of Fallon Little?

Lost in the Sun by Lisa Graff Monday July 13th 2015 There's a Book for That

Updates on my 2015 Reading Goals:

2015 Chapter Book Challenge: 37/80 complete

Goodreads Challenge: 242/415 books read

#MustReadin2015: 15/24 complete

Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge: 48/100 titles

Diverse Books in 2015: 26/50 books read

Up next? I am about to begin The Great Good Summer by Liz Garton Scanlon