Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016

Picture book 10 for 10 is here! Not many days can rival the picture book love shared on this day!

This celebration of picture books is hosted by Cathy from Reflect and Refine: Building a Learning Community and Mandy from Enjoy and Embrace Learning. Thanks to both of them for the work they do to promote this wonderful day of picture book sharing!

This is my fifth year participating in this event. In 2012, I shared ten beloved titles. In 2013, I went with a theme: Connections across the generations. In 2014, I shared ten “go to” titles on various themes like generosity, courage and forgiveness. Last year I highlighted favourite historical fiction titles.

This year I chose books that may inspire philosophical discussion. BIG questions with no absolute answer. Questions about meaning. And truth. Knowledge and reality. Ethics and morals. Books that will allow readers to think critically. To reason. To argue. To listen. To take risks in understanding and meaning making. To stretch one question into deeper and more complex questions.

Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016 There's a Book for That

For each title I have listed the initial questions I had after reading. Of course, in a room full of readers and thinkers, these questions would only grow!

Little Bird written by Germano Zullo and illustrated by Albertine

Little Bird Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016 There's a Book for That

Is a small thing insignificant? What state of being do we need to be in to notice small details?  How does this noticing change our reality?

You Call That Brave by Lorenz Pauli and Kathrin Schärer

You Call that Brave Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016 There's a Book for That

What is courage? Is it an action or a decision? How do we determine what is bravery? Can a brave act for one be common place for another?

This Moose Belongs to Me by Oliver Jeffers

this moose belongs to me Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016 There's a Book for That

What is ownership? Do we have the right to “own” something live? If yes, what responsibilities go along with this? Or is it even possible to own a living thing?

The Gift of Nothing by Patrick McDonnell

The Gift of Nothing Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016 There's a Book for That

What is nothing? Is it something? Does it have value? Significance? How do we measure the power or weight of nothing?

There by Marie-Louise Fitzpatrick

There Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016 There's a Book for That

Is there a place that brings bigger happiness? What are we searching for? Is it someplace we have been?  Or someplace we only imagine? Can we truly be in the moment or are we always thinking ahead or looking back?

Wild by Emily Hughes

Wild Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016 There's a Book for That

Can our true self be changed? What do we mean by the influence of nature or nurture? What is freedom? Can our spirit be contained? How much of our inner life is our own?

The Dog that Nino Didn’t Have written by Edward van de Vendel and illustrated by Anton Van Hertbruggen

The Dog that Nino didn't have Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016 There's a Book for That

Where is the place between imagination and reality? Can what we imagine make us truly happy? Which is superior – imagination or reality? In which circumstances?

Something Extraordinary by Ben Clanton,

Something Extraordinary Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016 There's a Book for That

What is real? What is fuelled by imagination? How does that influence our reality? Is there beauty in simplicity? In the everyday? Does it count if we don’t notice it?

 My Teacher is a Monster by Peter Brown 

My Teacher is A Monster (No, I am Not!) Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016 There's a Book for That

What defines us? Who we are or how we are perceived? How does emotion affect perception? How does our reality change over time? How does experience alter reality?

Grandad’s Island by Benji Davies 

Grandad's Island Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016 There's a Book for That

Is there life after death? What would it be like? Do those we love remain with us? How? Where?

Follow along on twitter using the #pb10for10 hashtag. All posts will be linked on the Google Community Site for Picture Book 10 for 10

pb-10-for-10

Happy picture book reading!  

36 thoughts on “Big questions: picture books that inspire philosophical discussion #pb10for10 2016

  1. Carrie,
    So many interesting questions to ponder. I had to smile over your question, “what is nothing?”. There’s a picture book called “Let’s Do Nothing” that might fit right into that discussion. If I remember correctly you’re moving up in grade level this year. These questions will be perfect to ponder with your new students. Thanks for joining the celebration. I always look forward to the titles you curate.

    Cathy

  2. I adore the theme of your list, Carrie. I feel like now that my daughter is getting close to starting Kindergarten (i.e., two weeks from today), it’s time for us to step-up our picture book reading so we can have bigger discussions. I will have to check out some of these titles so we can do that. THANK YOU for the inspiration.

  3. I love seeing My Teacher is a Monster appear on so many different lists with so many different themes. Says something about the depth of funny picture books!

  4. Those are great questions to ask! I think you’ll have some great conversations around these books this year in your new classroom!
    I haven’t read the Jeffers book. I’ll have to check that one out!

  5. Every time I come to your blog, I learn more about titles I need to read. Thank you! I was able to reinstate a true story time this past year, where we simply lingered in text. And quite often we would get philosophical and end up on big questions. Books are beautiful that way aren’t they? Thanks for sharing today.

  6. Oh, Carrie … does this list represent you so well, or what?!? Always a thinker and one to inspire thinking in your classroom and around the world! I love it!!!!

  7. Beautiful list, my friend – and a theme very close to my heart! Of course we both love Grandad’s Island! It is so gentle and through-provoking. Two titles on your list that I don’t know are You Call That Brave? and The Dog that Nino Didn’t Have. I will be looking out for those. Nice to see some of my favorites like There and Little Bird. Happy 10 for 10!

    • Grandad’s Island is the book that is currently calling to me “Buy me! Buy me!” And of course, I am unlikely to resist for long! The Dog that Nino Didn’t Have is wonderfully moody and odd. I loved it (and purchased it!)

  8. Your theme crosses all age groups, Carrie. Imagine presenting this group of books to middle school or high school writers as a springboard to their own writing!

  9. Pingback: Links I Loved This Week: A Round-Up of Online Reading 8/14/16 | the dirigible plum

  10. Somehow I missed this post last week. Love the theme and I’m off to request some new-to-me titles – Granddad’s Island, There, This Moose Belongs to Me, Little Bird, and You Call That Brave? Yikes, that’s half your list. I love the questions you included.

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