Monday February 20th, 2017

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

Each week I share a reading photo of the week. 

This week we started classroom book clubs. Here is my basket of book selections almost full of everyone’s choices.

Monday February 20th, 2017

Happy readers!Monday February 20th, 2017

I forgot to take a photo of our #classroombookaday titles last week so I made a collage. These titles were incredibly inspiring.

Monday February 20th, 2017

This week, this is what we read:

(Had to include this lovely drawing on the white board by one of my students inspired by Bluebird)

Monday February 20th, 2017

Our theme? Some said friendship. Others said kindness. Others said heroes.Monday February 20th, 2017

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

IMWAYR 2015

On the blog:

For Valentine’s Day, I couldn’t resist: 10 picture books about love for Top Ten Tuesday

10-picture-books-about-love

Books I enjoyed:

100 Things That Make Me Happy by Amy Schwartz

Best striped end pages! What makes you happy? Could you list a hundred things? And do some rhyming?

100-things-that-make-me-happy

Step Right Up: How Doc and Jim Key Taught the World about Kindness written by Donna Janell Bowman and illustrated by Daniel Minter

I had never heard of this amazing horse and his companion. Such a story!

step-right-up-how-doc-and-jim-key-taught-the-world-about-kindness

Welcome by Barroux

Barroux manages to say so much by saying so little. In this book, three lost polar bears search for a new home. How are these newcomers received? A timely story in our world.

welcome

Duck, Death and the Tulip by Wolf Erlbruch

A duck and Death spend some time at the pond. Unusual. Touching. Philosophical.

duck-death-and-the-tulip

Adrift at Sea: A Vietnamese Boy’s Story of Survival by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch with Tuan Ho Art by Brian Deines

A picture book that depicts a true story of the escape from Vietnam in 1981. Full of dangers, emotions and leaving home. I bought it for our class collection.

adrift-at-sea-a-vietnamese-boys-story-of-survival

Ballet Cat: What’s Your Favorite Favorite? by Bob Shea

This is not my favorite favorite of the Ballet Cat titles but still amusing enough to be enjoyable.

ballet-cat-whos-your-favorite-favorite

Hilo #3: The Great Big Boom by Judd Wick

Quite possibly I enjoyed this one more than Hilo book 2. This is a fantastic graphic series! So entertaining that I always read them first before bringing them into my classroom library – because then, I will never see these titles again!

hilo-3

Newsprints by Ru Xu

Gorgeous illustrations. I found some of the story line confusing but think this graphic title will have many fans.

newsprints

Finding Perfect by Elly Swartz

An emotional MG read about one young girl’s OCD that begins to spin out of control. Highly recommended.

finding-perfect-elly-swartz

It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas

Just fantastic! This book explores the Iranian Hostage Crisis, dealing with middle school while still figuring out America and all of the complexities of family and friendship a 12 year old girl from Iran might experience. And it’s super funny and touching and so wonderfully written! A must have for classroom libraries.

it-aint-so-awful-falafal

Reading Progress updates:

2017 Chapter Book Challenge: 10/75 complete

Goodreads Challenge: 52/365 books read

Progress on challenge: 3 books ahead of schedule!

#MustReadin2017: 6/30 complete

Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge: 10/50 titles

Diverse Books in 2016: 7/50 books read

Up next? I am reading Unusual Chickens for the Exceptional Poultry Farmer by Kelly Jones

Monday February 15th, 2015

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

Each week I share a reading photo of the week. That has grown to a few reading photos from the week . . .

We have continued to enjoy looking at nonfiction titles during our book sharing circles.

 There's a Book for That

I love the energy in each of these circles and how it spreads out around the room.

 There's a Book for That

This was taken during a read aloud of Orion and the Dark shared by a guest reader. The kids couldn’t get close enough!

 There's a Book for That

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

IMWAYR 2015

On the blog:

My second Slice of Life: Bad Irony (I will admit that I find this writing kind of terrifying)

For Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: The nonfiction effect Here, I talk about beginning to introduce more nonfiction titles to my current class.

My weekly Celebration post: Afternoons: the good, the not so great and the green

Books I enjoyed:

Orion and the Dark by Emma Yarlett

This book is all kinds of gorgeous. The story is delightful – forming a friendship with the very thing that scares you most and learning a new way to see the world in the process. But the illustrations and artistic choices, simply fabulous.

Orion and the Dark

Ballet Cat: Dance! Dance! Underpants! by Bob Shea

Giggle. Giggle. Giggle. Can’t wait to read this aloud to a whole class. I started with one little guy not yet picked up in the office one afternoon and he thought it was pretty amusing. Well, very amusing. I asked him if he thought my class would listen without laughing. “No way, not possible,” he told me.

Ballet Cat: Dance! Dance! Underpants!

Strictly No Elephants written by Lisa Mantchev and illustrated by Taeeun Yoo

Kind of adorable. And a beautiful message of inclusivity.

Strictly No Elephants

Waiting by Kevin Henkes

Quiet. Gentle. Full. Loved this title. Think I will love it more and more as I read it and share it.

Waiting

Welcome, Precious written by Nikki Grimes and illustrated by Bryan Collier

An ideal new baby celebration book. Gift it to new parents – it celebrates all of the amazing of a baby joining the family.

Welcome Precious

Two White Rabbits by Jairo Buitrago and Rafael Yockteng

This title is weighty in its simple, missing pieces kind of narration. Nothing is specifically clear but this is what I enjoyed about this title. Rich in emotion, its multitude of stories and our human need to find home and safe.

Two White Rabbits

Thank You and Goodnight by Patrick McDonnell

Perhaps the perfect bedtime book. I love the pure exhaustion that eventually triumphs.

Thank you and Good Night

Reading Progress updates:

2016 Chapter Book Challenge: 6/75 complete

Goodreads Challenge: 45/400 books read

#MustReadin2016: 5/30 complete

Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge: 11/100 titles

Diverse Books in 2015: 8/50 books read

I continue reading (almost done) The Unlikely Hero of Room 13B by Teresa Toten and have just started All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely as a read aloud with my family.

Top Ten Read Aloud Experiences (2015)

The #TopTenTuesday theme this week is the top ten best books read in 2015. How we interpret this theme? Up to us. I have some Best of Lists coming up on the blog so I decided to tackle this list a little differently.

My theme this week: Top Ten Read Aloud experiences of 2015.

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme created by The Broke and Bookish.

TTT

I am looking at the calendar year of 2015. From January to June I taught a Grade 3/4 class. Since September I have taught a Grade 2/3 class.

The Scar written by Charolette Moundlic and illustrated by Olivier Tallec

I happen to own a number of books that deal with grief. I always figured that when I needed them, I would have them. And so I keep them close. Now, I need them. Sharing this very emotionally challenging book about a little boy whose mother has died with a little one who needed to see herself in the pages of a book was a read aloud experience I will never forget. Ever. Watching her lighter afterwards made me so glad I have that important stack for when.

The Scar

Lady Pancake & Sir French Toast written by Josh Funk and illustrated by Brendan Kearney

I appreciated all of the pre-book love this title got in my room. And so, of course, my students from last year had to come in during a recess to have me read this title aloud when Josh Funk sent it our way. This book will always represent serious reading community.

Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast

Dory Fantasmagory by Abby Hanlon

This was the first read aloud I attempted with my class this fall. I needed an all kinds of amazing title for a group of kids who had never experienced a chapter book read aloud before. This book delivered!

I was thrilled that Abby Hanlon shared our read aloud joy with this book on her blog.

Dory Fantasmagory

This is Sadie written by Sara O’Leary and illustrated by Julie Morstad

When students remain after the bell just to share impressions and reactions, you know you have a winner. I blogged about our beautiful read aloud experience here.

This is Sadie

Wish by Matthew Cordell 

This book means something to me on many, many levels. I read it aloud to my class of three years to send them off on our last day together with the very important message – they were everything I could have wished for and more . . .  And yes, I cried. Those joyous, emotional, meaningful tears.

Wish

Little Robot by Ben Hatke

I have never read aloud a graphic novel before. A graphic novel that is basically wordless but for a number of robot noises. This title held my class absolutely spell bound. And inspired!

Little Robot

Little Robot

Sam and Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Jon Klassen

Shouting. Shouting. Shouting. This book will always be about the shouting audience. “No! They missed it again!” “Oh my God!” “Seriously?!” This book absolutely surpassed my read aloud expectations!

Sam & Dave Dig a Hole

A Boy and A Jaguar written by Alan Rabinowitz and illustrated by

There was some absolute blow me away kind of thinking around this book in my class. I recorded it here. Children’s compassion and wisdom is a beautiful thing.

A Boy and a Jaguar

Ballet Cat: The Totally Secret Secret by Bob Shea

Reading this title was definitely about watching a book be loved. It was also about watching fans be made. Loved every minute of it!

Ballet Cat

Each Little Bird That Sings by Deborah Wiles

This is such an incredible title to read aloud. There are moments where the room fills with hold your breath hope that I might not ever forget. This title made funerals such a fascinating prospect that one student earnestly asked my parents (reading volunteers extraordinaire) if she could attend their funerals! I suppose when you spend all day with 8 year olds, the past 65 year olds who visit once a week seem like your best “might have a funeral” prospects. My parents have great senses of humour so recounting this request has been a constant source of amusement!

Each Little Bird That Sings

Do you have some unforgettable read aloud moments?

Sunday Reflections: Honest Truths, Metaphorical whales, and the “in between” place

So if you are a voracious children’s book addict, you often experience the world in relation to images and phrases in children’s books. If you have a blog called There’s a Book for That,  you absolutely do . . . Some of you, I know, are with me. Yes?

“Shhh!” I often exclaim, “I have a plan.” (Full credit to Chris Haughton‘s Shh! We Have a Plan) And the children, they actually stop and listen. Yes, for about 2.5 seconds, but still.

When I do something particularly impressive, I might deem it “skilly” (thank you Bob Shea and Cheetah) The “skilly” descriptor elevates things. And makes us smile.

Holy Bagumba!” once was uttered in my classroom (a classroom besotted with Flora & Ulysses) multiple times a day. For a while, when I was reading one of the Clementine novels (thank you Sara Pennypacker) the children delighted in affectionately calling each other vegetable names. Nowadays, we pretend to have Mrs. Gobble Gracker sightings. (Thank you to Abby Hanlon and the wonderful Dory books) Sometimes, I am almost convinced she is lurking around the corner. Sometimes, in very hopeful ways. I could go have a third cup of coffee and Mrs. Gobble Gracker could take care of everything.

A recent afternoon consisted of a mini Betty Bunny (thank you Michael B. Kaplan) reading marathon. All of us professed our love for chocolate cake or equally divine lemon tarts, strawberry cupcakes or apple pie. Although none of us wanted to stuff any of these favourite desserts into our socks (Betty Bunny Loves Chocolate Cake is a must read), we did certainly identify with Betty’s intense love for delicious sweet treats.

We then read Betty Bunny Didn’t Do it and talked a lot about the honest truth. Betty, has switched her obsession from chocolate cake to honest lies and the “situations” she anticipates them saving her from. Honest truths. Honest lies. In the world of Betty Bunny? Quite hilarious. And of course, perfect inspiration for those important conversations we can have with children about accepting responsibility, “owning up” and dealing with the consequences.

I keep thinking about life right now in these categories. Honest truths. Honest lies. The honest truth? This has been a challenging fall. For some reasons I can share freely and for some reasons I can’t. Unfortunately, much is not in my control. Also the truth? That when lots is hard, we doubt what we know. We get pulled from our confidence. We drift from our strengths. We see clouds over what we trust. We don’t feel all that skilly.

Honest lies? Sometimes I tell them to myself until I can get back to the truth. What are they? That I am fully coping. The truth? Not really. Not always. I have been drifting. I have been waiting to see the metaphorical whale in front of me – the inspiration and the amazing in a class full of children that can and does outweigh the challenges that might be swimming around. But storms have taken me off course. I have been doing it all wrong. I have been looking the wrong way.

In If you want to see a whale, the beautiful book written by Julie Fogaliano and illustrated by Erin E. Stead, Fogliano writes,

“If you want to see a whale, keep both eyes on the sea and wait . . . and wait . . .  and wait . . .”

I have not had both eyes on the sea. My attention has been pulled. I have been looking at foggy, cloudy skies and missing things. But I have kept faith that one day again soon, I will look out at the right time, in the right way and see. When I see my “whale” I will realize that my boat is strong and steady, that I can row in rough waves and that I can pause and appreciate the wonder and the magic of teaching children. I can recognize that multiple little sightings of amazing lead to something with the promise as enormous as a whale.

I didn’t know that Marla Frazee would point me in the exact direction I needed to look. But she did.

Yesterday, Marla Frazee addressed an audience of picture book lovers and devoted fans at the Vancouver Children’s Literature Roundtable‘s Illustrator breakfast. She began with a gracious acknowledgement of her welcome and introduction. She honoured Vancouver’s torrential rain, calling it beautiful and welcome to a California resident. And then, before she launched into an inspirational talk about her books and her art and her practice, she asked, “Is Carrie here?” Once we figured out that she was actually talking about me, I raised my hand. “I just wanted to see who you were,” she explained.

The honest truth? This simple statement was a gift. It made me teary. Teary beyond being flattered that my “super fan status” and my sharing of how meaningful Marla’s titles have been in my classroom had also meant something to her.

Yesterday, in that room full of picture book love, these words from Marla Frazee brought me back. In my searching for a whale metaphor, they steadied my boat. But really, they planted my feet. Right back where they needed to be. They reminded me of who I am.

I am a teacher. A teacher who believes firmly in the gift of literacy.  I am a conduit between authors and illustrators who have magic to give and the children who need to receive it. And when I can, I reflect it back. I love nothing more than to share how very beloved stories are in a community of little readers. I am blessed to sit “in between“- in the middle of the book makers and the readers and listeners who they make these books for.

How lucky we are – reading teachers – who get to read aloud to children daily. To put amazing books in the hands of children. To witness as all of the creative energies, the stories, the world flows to these students entrusted to us from nine to three each day. To bask in the wow moments as these children shine it back out into the world. And sometimes, to catch bits of that and pass it back to the book makers who shared in the first place . . .  It is a beautiful thing.

The honest truth? I am a reading teacher. And I have important work to do. Marla Frazee, thank you for reminding me of this. What a pleasure it was to listen to your wisdom and meet you yesterday.

Sunday Reflections: Honest Truths, Metaphorical whales, and the

Thank you also to the wonderful Nancy Johnson from Western Washington University who I loved visiting with yesterday. She hears the same words I do when we are in the presence of author/illustrator brilliance and writes them down and holds them close. I love that we both know that through books we find most of the answers and all of the questions and that these beloved book makers, when they share, help to illuminate both. Your students, Nancy, are so blessed to have you shine the light on this.

And so, on Monday, I will do what I do. I will let books do what they do. Yesterday, I found the perspective and the emotion I had been missing. Hard things wear us down. It would be an honest lie to say all is well, but honestly, truthfully, I feel like I have renewed energy to focus on what I need to be doing each day.

For me, yes. But more importantly, for my students.

For the children who want to be readers and who aren’t yet . . . For each child, no matter how they express this – through quiet admissions, through masking behaviours, through various emotions, through smiles of pride as progress happens. For these children, I will continue searching for books that each one can read at every stage so that we all get to feel like the books in our room are for all of us. I made a pit stop at Vancouver Kidsbooks yesterday, to fuel up. Yes, there are over a thousand books in my classroom library but each new group of readers has new needs and so I will always be book shopping.

Sunday Reflections: Honest Truths, Metaphorical whales, and the

For Joey in my class who just wants to read all day and is on #2 of Stone Rabbit and our classroom library has only #1 to #3, I purchased these. Because nothing makes me happier than hearing a child tell me, “I just want to read all day. Can I?” Oh, reading bug, I hope the contagion factor is very high. Go forth and infect!

Sunday Reflections: Honest Truths, Metaphorical whales, and the

For the children who comment, “Look at all of those books we have read,” I will continue to read aloud. Every day. Multiple times. For those who ask me to read more books like “this” of “that” I will find them and I will read them so that all of us are hearing the stories we need to hear.

Sunday Reflections: Honest Truths, Metaphorical whales, and the

For the Elephant and Piggie devotion, we will celebrate and read and read and read. And giggle, of course.

Sunday Reflections: Honest Truths, Metaphorical whales, and the

For the buddy reading pride. Such an amazing thing to watch these moments between my students and the little ones who come to visit each Wednesday afternoon. As Marla Frazee said yesterday, anything an illustrator puts in a picture, the children will see. They naturally know how to read pictures. I want to give them multiple opportunities to do just this.

Sunday Reflections: Honest Truths, Metaphorical whales, and the

Because I have readers to support. Because I have learners to celebrate. Because this is what I believe in. All the World shines through when I know this.

Sunday Reflections: Honest Truths, Metaphorical whales, and the

And yes, for those who have been asking, more blog posts should be happening. Soon. Maybe not quite as often but they are coming.

Top Ten Tuesday: The Last Ten Books That Came into my Possession

It’s time for Top Ten Tuesday, a meme created by The Broke and Bookish.

TTT

This week’s topic? The Last Ten Books That Came into my Possession

A hard one to answer – I just visited the book store and did a huge hold pick up at the library. A LOT of books just came into my possession! So, I thought I would think back over the last few months and make a list that shows some variety – both in the kinds of books and the kinds of reasons I now own them.

Shared in no particular order:

The Alex Crow by Andrew Smith 

I managed to purchase this book days before it was released. Andrew Smith was here in Vancouver to speak at a literacy conference so the book was brought in a little early. And I got it signed. And I got to chat books and teaching with Andrew Smith. What could be better?

 The Alex Crow Top Ten Tuesday: The Last Ten Books That Came into my Possession There's a Book for That

Jinx’s Fire by Sage Blackwood

My copy of this is an ARC that I got at nErD Camp Bellingham this spring. I own and have read the first two titles in this trilogy so can’t wait to read this one! It might be a read aloud to my children. I read them the second title and we finished it quite delightfully in the forest.

Jinx's Fire Top Ten Tuesday: The Last Ten Books That Came into my Possession There's a Book for That

A Handful of Stars by Cynthia Lord

I am so excited to meet Cynthia Lord next spring at the Western Washington University’s Children’s Literature Conference! I purchased this book at the end of the year from Scholastic so I could be caught up!

A Handful of stars Top Ten Tuesday: The Last Ten Books That Came into my Possession There's a Book for That

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

I read and loved this title when it was first released. Then I heard that Jacqueline was coming to Vancouver. I purchased the first two tickets sold to see her! My husband and I had an evening out – hearing Jacqueline Woodson and all of her brilliance and then we went for dinner. I bought a copy to have signed and I smile every time I see it on my shelf.

brown girl dreaming Top Ten Tuesday: The Last Ten Books That Came into my Possession There's a Book for That

Mark of a Thief by Jennifer A. Nielsen 

I am a huge fan of Jennifer Nielsen. My children and I went to see her when Vancouver Kidsbooks hosted an author evening last year. As a family we listened to The False Prince and then I read the next two titles in the series aloud to my children. I was eagerly anticipating this novel and lucky me, received it as a gift from one of my classroom volunteers. So excited to read it!

Mark of the Thief Top Ten Tuesday: The Last Ten Books That Came into my Possession There's a Book for That

Pool by JiHyeon Lee 

I am completely helpless to the power of wordless titles. When I discover one that is beautiful, I can’t resist purchasing it. This one had me at the cover.

Pool Top Ten Tuesday: The Last Ten Books That Came into my Possession There's a Book for That

Wish by Matthew Cordell 

I have a huge variety of emotional and beautiful reasons why I had to own this book. It was meant for me as I know it is meant for many who finally have their most important of all wishes granted.

WIsh-Matthew Cordell Top Ten Tuesday: The Last Ten Books That Came into my Possession There's a Book for That

Ballet Cat: The Totally Secret Secret by Bob Shea 

Oh Bob Shea. You have full out giggle power over my students. I read this. Bought it. Read it aloud. Had it snatched from me. Daily, it would be momentarily returned. “Read it to all of us again.” I would. Then, snatched again. There are currently no students in my classroom. HA! I can go and read it anytime I want. Come September, I know I will never see it again. As it should be.

 Ballet Cat Top Ten Tuesday: The Last Ten Books That Came into my Possession There's a Book for That

Egg: Nature’s Perfect Package by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page

Anything Steve Jenkins does, I have to own. I am always reading some parts of a Jenkins title to my students. We learn so much, so beautifully, from this man!

Egg Top Ten Tuesday: The Last Ten Books That Came into my Possession There's a Book for That

I’m Trying to Love Spiders by Bethany Barton

I have a brand new group of students this fall. I want to hook them quickly on nonfiction – what better way to do it than through humour and spiders. Learning as you laugh! Perfect.

Trying to Love Spiders Top Ten Tuesday: The Last Ten Books That Came into my Possession There's a Book for ThatWhat have you purchased/acquired lately and why?

Monday June 15th, 2015

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

I have been sharing a reading photo of the week each week. This week I had a LOT of amazing reading related photos. I managed to narrow it down to these two.

Here are some of my boys during Reading Workshop. I love their focus. I love the little community they formed for this morning of reading. I love that they just read and read and read.

 Monday June 15th, 2015 There's a Book for That

This photo is about a little bit of Ballet Cat love. I shared Ballet Cat by Bob Shea with my class. During buddy reading, one of my students read it to Ms. Ishihara. She shared it with her K class and had them go outside and draw ballet cat in chalk. After school, two girls showed me their drawings. I asked if I could take their picture. “Yes!” they agreed. Then, they lay down beside their art, “We’re dancing with her,” they explained! Can’t possibly get more charming than this!

 Monday June 15th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

imwayr

Report cards are due this week and so I have read less (because of the writing) and blogged more (because I would rather be writing what I want) so I am sharing some recent posts and only a few books.

This week I shared a collection of beautiful nonfiction titles perfect for the family bookshelf. Gifting books? Choose one of these

Nonfiction Picture Books- Grow a beginning collection

nonfiction picture books Grow a collection

I also participated in Top Ten Tuesday for the very first time and shared a list of books I am happily anticipating in the rest of 2015.

And we all know book love – we fall into it often. But here is some wonderful pre-book love shared in my classroom for Josh Funk‘s first picture book: Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast

Celebration: Predictions, Book Love and Syrup

Lady Pancake Cover Image (2)

The books I read this week:

The Story of Life: A First Book about Evolution by Catherine Barr and Steve Williams, illustrated by Amy Husband

I just read Island: A Story of the Galápagos by Jason Chin to my class to introduce the concept of evolution. Many children were enthralled. I would happily book talk this title and let them carefully examine all of the details  amongst themselves. Fun illustrations and lots of information.

The Story of Life- A First Book about evolution  Monday June 15th, 2015 There's a Book for That

The Secret Life of Squirrels by Nancy Rose

I really don’t like squirrels. I appreciate how complex the photography was for this book. But I really don’t like squirrels. The amusing was lost on me as I was just irritated by the thought of squirrels running up the side of my house, raiding my bird feeders, etc.

The Secret Life of Squirrels  Monday June 15th, 2015 There's a Book for That

You are (Not) Small by Anna Kang and illustrated by Christopher Weyant

A simple little title with huge humour. Absolutely brilliant. I don’t want to give anything away but I do highly recommend picking up this book if you haven’t read it.

 You are not Small  Monday June 15th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Anna Hibiscus by Atinuke 

I am falling more and more for this author. Just a delightful young chapter book. Perfect for new chapter book readers or a classroom read aloud in primary. This title has so much going for it that it beautifully unique – set in Africa, full of family celebrations and each chapter is a tiny story.

Anna Hibiscus  Monday June 15th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Love, Ruby Lavender by Deborah Wiles

Grandmothers and granddaughters, small town charm, chickens and Deborah Wiles. Oh did I love this one.

Love, Ruby Lavender  Monday June 15th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Updates on my 2015 Reading Goals:

2015 Chapter Book Challenge: 29/80 complete

Goodreads Challenge: 216/415 books read

#MustReadin2015: 11/24 complete

Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge: 46/100 titles

Diverse Books in 2015: 22/50 books read

Up next? I am reading Call Me By My Name by John Ed Bradley

Monday June 1st, 2015

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

I have been sharing a reading photo of the week each week.  I love this photo of my student reading to his little K buddy. They were sitting in amongst books behind a bookshelf reading together. Calm, content, engaged. I love this photo 🙂

Monday June 1st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

imwayrYard Sale written by Eve Bunting and illustrated by Lauren Castillo

When I first heard about this book, I was so very excited. So many of my all time favourite picture books have been written by Eve Bunting. So many of the books I have loved lately have been illustrated by Lauren Castillo. A book with their combined talents? What could be better? Well, that is a loaded question. Certainly, not much could be better. But, I should have anticipated that this amazing talent combined would also mean a whole lot of emotion captured in a picture book experience. Eve Bunting tells such important and raw stories. Lauren Castillo‘s illustrations have a charming, nostalgic, open feel. This book slowly, gently, beautifully delivers. It managed to knock me over by the time I reached the back cover. Full of love, connection and a child’s need for security, this is a beautiful, important book.

 Yard Sale Monday June 1st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Wish by Matthew Cordell

Becoming a parent was not an easy feat for my husband and me. Infertility. Pain. Longing. All of these things were my world for four years. Finally, our second in vitro attempt was successful and now I have 12 year old twins! Honestly, reading this book made that turmoil feel like yesterday and I am teary each time I read this title. However, despite the sad emotions there is so much hope and celebration here. What a special book.

WIsh-Matthew Cordell Monday June 1st, 2015 There's a Book for That

I so appreciate Matthew Cordell for capturing, so tenderly, the feeling of wishing for that very wanted child.

Water is Water written by Miranda Paul and illustrated by Jason Chin

Lyrical, informative, and beautiful. This nonfiction picture book is the perfect book to launch a study of water. I think it will be one of the first books I share with my new class in the fall along with many hands on water experiments.

Water Is Water- A Book About the Water Cycle Monday June 1st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Hippos are Huge! written by Jonathan London and illustrated by Matthew Trueman

I will be sharing this title along with student reviews later this week. A fantastic nonfiction picture book read aloud.

Hippos are huge! Monday June 1st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Ballet Cat: The Totally Secret Secret by Bob Shea

I could rave and rave about this little gem. Suffice it to say as soon as I finished reading this title aloud, my class felt compelled to write notes to the author begging for more from Sparkles and Ballet Cat!

 Ballet Cat Monday June 1st, 2015 There's a Book for That

 Monday June 1st, 2015 There's a Book for That Monday June 1st, 2015 There's a Book for That

No 1 Car Spotter by Atinuke

This illustrated chapter book is ideal for younger readers but better still I think, a perfect read aloud for a Grade 1-3 class early in the year. Much to love in this title: the unique characters, the entertaining dynamics and the beautiful setting of Africa. So very, very good.

No1_Car_Spotter Monday June 1st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Blackbird Fly by Erin Entrada Kelly

Early on I wasn’t so sure about this novel. There was nasty middle grade interactions that made me absolutely cringe. Cruelty, insensitivity, racism. Miserable stuff. But midway through, I began to love the friendship developing between Apple and Evan. Evan is a kid I wish existed in every school – so many young people need him to help navigate the social world that can be so cruel. He approaches it with wise perspective and personal strength. He’s just plain smart and really right on so many levels. Lots to think about and talk about in this debut novel.

Blackbird Fly Monday June 1st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Updates on my 2015 Reading Goals:

2015 Chapter Book Challenge: 27/80 complete

Goodreads Challenge: 205/415 books read

#MustReadin2015: 11/24 complete

Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge: 44/100 titles

Diverse Books in 2015: 20/50 books read

Up next? I am delighted to be once again reading Deborah Wiles: Love, Ruby Lavender