Monday August 22nd, 2016

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

Each week I share a reading photo of the week. During the summer, these photos will be about getting my classroom library up and running for a room full of readers in September.

Here is my read aloud by theme collection nicely tucked into a cabinet.

Monday August 22nd, 2016 There's a Book for That

Nonfiction? Yes! One area (still missing labels) sorted and ready for readers. Working on another area tomorrow.

Monday August 22nd, 2016 There's a Book for That

This week, I started labelling spines by genre. Getting there literally one book at a time.

Monday August 22nd, 2016 There's a Book for That

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

IMWAYR 2015

Books I enjoyed:

Pirasaurs written by Josh Funk and illustrated by Michael Slack

Huge kid appeal in this title. I featured it earlier this week here.

Pirasaurs JF

The Knowing Book written by Rebecca Kai Dotlich with illustrations by Matthew Cordell

When this book was first published, someone said it was my kind of book. It is most definitely my kind of book. Gently perfect. I think I need to own it.

The Knowing Book

 A Beginner’s Guide To Bear Spotting by Michelle Robinson with illustrations by David Roberts

This is funny – funny while all the while worried about a child actually getting mauled by a bear – funny. Very interesting to use as a mentor text for writing – how are facts and humour woven throughout? Would love to read this aloud to a group of students.

A Beginner's Guide To Bear Spotting

 

Ooko by Esmé Shapiro

The perfect kind of quirky, charming story line and illustrations. Lots of humour. And a dose of what to look for in a friend advice. Pay close attention.

Ooko

The Dunderheads by Paul Fleischman with illustrations by David Roberts

How had I missed reading this one? Love David Roberts’ illustrations here. .

The Dunderheads

This is NOT a Cat! by David Larochelle with illustrations by Mike Wohnoutka

This would be a very fun and loud read aloud experience with little listeners who would soon become active participants. Such fun!

This is NOT a cat!

Clara Humble and the Not so Super Powers by Anna Humphrey with illustrations by Lisa Cinar

This is the first book in a new series perfectly suited to readers Grade 3 and up. Clara Humble is convinced that she has super powers. More and more things happen that make it seem perfectly plausible. And if you have super powers, you really should use them . . . Right? This title has much young reader appeal: interesting comic drawings featuring @Cat (Clara’s very own comic strip), an honest, mistake making character full of creative plans and imaginative thinking and a plot full of action, adventure and friendship mishaps. Like many chapter book series for younger readers, this title is fast paced and funny but it doesn’t shy away from allowing the reader to experience some of Clara’s challenges and blunders and what she needs to do to make things right. I look forward to introducing this series to my new class this fall.

Clara Humble and the Not so Super Powers

Nine, Ten: A September 11th Story by Nora Raleigh Baskin

Told from the perspective of four different young characters in the few days preceding September 11th, 2001, this novel weaves themes of human connection, vulnerabilities and emotions. Powerful, honest and important. Beautiful writing by Baskin.

Nine, Ten- A September 11th Story

Reading Progress updates:

2016 Chapter Book Challenge: 34/75 complete

Goodreads Challenge: 231/400 books read

#MustReadin2016: 20/30 complete

Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge: 32/100 titles

Diverse Books in 2016: 29/50 books read

Up Next? I am reading The Land of Forgotten Girls by Erin Entrada Kelly

Monday August 10th, 2015

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

I have been sharing a reading photo of the week each week. Now that it is summer, I am not surrounded every day with little readers so . . . I am choosing moments from the year not previously shared. Here is a moment during Reading Workshop where quiet reading had to be interrupted for some choral reading together!

From the classroom 2014/2015 archives:

Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

imwayr

I missed last week because we were away on holiday so this post includes two weeks of reading. I will try to be brief!

On the blog:

For Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Favourite Fairy Tale Retellings

A collection of picture books featuring whales and details of my gray whale sighting!

My classroom library: Beyond the books, 10 important features

A celebration in photos of our time away

Sunday Reflections: Goals for my Readers

Books I read and loved:

Sonya’s Chickens by Phoebe Wahl

This title was waiting for me in my mailbox when I arrived home from my trip. Thank you Tundra Books! I had a hard time getting past the cover – isn’t it gorgeous? And then I looked under the book jacket – the book jacket is 2 sided. There was some swooning and dancing before I could sit down and read this book. Once I read it, I missed my class! This book will be a title I share in the first week of school when I still have my class from last year. I can’t wait to see how those students respond. Sonya is raising chickens and takes her job ever so seriously. Not only does she care for these chickens, she adores them. One night, there is a lot of noise out in the coop and Sonya needs her parent’s guidance to navigate what has happened. A story about nature, responsibility and hope.

Sonya's Chickens Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for Thatv

Ninja! by Arree Chung

This book is full of cheeky energy! Would be very fun to read aloud to a young group of listeners.

ninja arree chung Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Crankenstein written by Samantha Berger and illustrated by Dan Santat

Hmm. . . I think there are some mornings when Crankenstein lives at my house. I won’t say who in my family seems to disappear when he arrives. But let’s just say I have met this character!

Crankenstein Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for That

The New Small Person by Lauren Child

A sweet and honest little story about adjusting to a new sibling.

The New Small Person Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Hug Me by Simona Ciraolo

Loved the illustrations and that the main character in need of a hug was a cactus! Think this would prompt lots of discussions about not making assumptions. Very cute.

Hug-Me Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for That

The Grasshopper & the Ants by Jerry Pinkney

A gorgeously illustrated rendition of the popular fable – with a bit of a musical twist.

The Grasshopper & The Ants Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Sona and the Wedding Game written by Kashmira Sheth and illustrated by Yoshiko Jaeggi

I learned so much about Hindu wedding ceremonies! This book was pure delight.

 Sona Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Ruby on the Outside by Nora Raleigh Baskin

A different kind of grieving – for a way family might have been. A story of courage and secrets and friendship. Would make a wonderful book club title.

Ruby on the outside Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Openly Straight by Bill Konigsberg

I read this in one sitting while we were away on holiday. I got completely caught up with the characters. So much vulnerability, I worried about everyone. a beautiful book about relationships, honesty and living your truth.

Openly Straight Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for That

None of the Above by I.W. Gregario

What an important YA title about a character who is intersex – something she does not discover until she is eighteen years old. Author I.W. Gregario is a practicing surgeon as well as an author so the medical aspects of the book are well explained. But this is more than a scientific read – it is very much a story of a girl who must come to terms with ignorant reactions from her peers and her own developing understanding of who she is. How can something physical define so much? Does it?

 None of the Above Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for That

George by Alex Gino

I picked this up at my local public library in the ARC section. How much do I love that this is a middle grade novel? It is a book I would love to have in my classroom library if I was teaching grade 4 again. What I know to be true – reading about experiences and differences removes ridiculous stereotypes and confusion and cruelty stemming from simple ignorance. Books like this allow children to read about a transgendered child and be able to get some of their questions answered. For a transgendered child, well, wow this book would mean everything. Also, I must celebrate these characters. Of course George is wonderful – she is open and honest and real. Also loved her brother and best friend. And the principal! Fantastic read. Look for it from Scholastic later this month.

George Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for That

A Handful of Stars by Cynthia Lord

A group of us has a twitter chat coming up this Wednesday to talk about this book. I can’t wait! For now, I will say this. I teared up three times reading it. Cynthia Lord, what a writer!

Handful of stars Monday August 10th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Updates on my 2015 Reading Goals:

2015 Chapter Book Challenge: 45/80 complete

Goodreads Challenge: 275/415 books read

#MustReadin2015: 15/24 complete

Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge: 52/100 titles

Diverse Books in 2015: 31/50 books read

Up next? My children and I are reading Mark of a Thief by Jennifer A. Nielsen and I am reading (finally, I know, I know) Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Monday February 18th, 2013

It’s Monday! What are you reading? 

Mon Reading Button PB to YA

Join up to Kellee and Jen’s meme and share what you have been reading from picture books to young adult novels.

I enjoyed many picture books this week. It seems many had a theme of friendship. Also dogs graced many a page and the name Hopper kept cropping up. Who knows why these things happen?

The Lonely Moose by John Segal Sometimes we think we don’t need friends. But once we’ve begun to enjoy the company of another, life can be pretty lonely once we are alone again. This is what this lovely little picture book explores.

the lonely moose

The Reader written by Amy Hest and illustrated by  Lauren Castillo I adore Castillo’s illustrations. Amy Hest never misses. Books, companionship and a snow day. This book is a wonderful nostalgic little read. The most clever thing of all? Calling the little boy the reader throughout the story. It just gives this story a whole other level.

the reader

Hopper and Wilson by Maria Van Lieshout I think there can never be too many picture books about friendship. So I was delighted to find another.

hopper-and-wilson

Harry and Hopper written by  Margaret Wild and illustrated by Freya Blackwood I am fast becoming a huge fan of Freya Blackwood’s illustrations. I love the scratchy, loose lines and the mood she creates through shading and colour. This book tackles themes of grief and a pet dying. It is done in a gentle, sweet way that respects everyone’s process.

harry and hopper

Dog Loves Drawing by Louise Yates Great message – that art, doodling. drawing can tell a story, allow for creativity and challenge the imagination.

dog loves drawing

You by Stephen Michael King I have a soft spot for Stephen Michael King’s illustrations. (Leaf is one of my favourites) A book that celebrates all of us.

you

Mirror Mirror written by Marilyn Singer and illustrated by Josee Masse Beyond clever. I have been sharing these poems with my reading group and we read each poem multiple times just being in awe how reversing words and changing phrasing alters everything.

Mirror_Mirror

Some nonfiction titles:

The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins written by Barbara Kerley and illustrated by  Brian Selznick I read this title to my own children. We have all read all of Selznick’s books so were excited to see his illustrations here (Caldecott honour worthy and all!) We were intrigued by how Hawkins made models of dinosaurs without having all of the definitive details that would be later discovered. Part of a story about the quest to “recreate” dinosaurs that we just didn’t know.

Waterhouse Hawkins

How the Dinosaur got to the Museum by Jessie Hartland We actually read this before The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins – it gave us all of the vocabulary to understand what is involved in erecting a dinosaur skeleton. Fascinating! And time consuming! Reading it with my children, we turned it into a memory game 🙂 Each time I got to the by the _______, I would pause and see who remembered the title! An excerpt:

“chiseled from the stone by the EXCAVATORS,
authenticated by the PALEONTOLOGIST,
and searched for by the DINOSAUR HUNTER.”

HowTheDino

I Have the Right to be a Child written by Alain Serres, illustrated by Aurelia Fronty Such an accessible book for children to learn about the rights of children everywhere. Gorgeously illustrated.

I have the right to be a child

I finished two novels this week:

Anything but Typical written by Nora Raleigh Baskin Is this cover not just absolutely stunning? Loved pausing in this book just to stare at it. A fantastic middle grade read narrated by a boy with autism. Themes of family, friendship and identity. So much to this story. Baskin weaves many stories into this one vulnerable tale. It is challenging enough to fit in as a preteen, what happens when you are autistic and your very reactions to the world guarantee you stand out?

anything-but-typical

Fourmile written by Watt Key This book manages to be both all about the characters and yet it doesn’t scrimp on action. There is always something going on – even under the surface of the simplest and mundane tasks like painting a fence. Sometimes the goings on are dramatic and frightening. Steeped in hurt, pain and longing, this story also reveals the vulnerability and strength in the characters. While, the main character is a twelve year old boy, some of the disturbing scenes might make this more of a young adult read. Or a middle grade . . .  with caution. I continue to love this author after first reading Alabama Moon and being blown away.

Fourmile

Next up? Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz