Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback

This week I celebrate the winding up of our #MockCaldecott process. The books are read. The voting complete. The winners selected. The evaluations written. Now these titles are read, reread and treasured. They are pieces of our reading lives.

I can’t quite figure out how to share just how much this entire process exceeded my expectations. There is normally a LOT of picture book love in my classroom. This took it over the top. In the very best of ways.

 Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback There's a Book for That

We read each book together as a class over a two week period. Talking. Noticing. Savouring. Rereading.

And then it was time to vote. A rich and thoughtful process. Students revisited many of the titles and carefully considered their votes.

 Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback There's a Book for That

Students rated each of our eleven titles on a scale of 1-5 for 3 questions:

This book is a book kids will really appreciate. 1  2  3  4  5

The illustrations in this book are excellent in quality. 1  2  3  4  5

The illustrations are a great fit for the story being told. 1  2  3  4  5

I loved watching students and adults talk together and share what they noticed.

 Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback There's a Book for That

As students each selected 3 favourites to write more about, I witnessed collaboration and celebration.

 Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback There's a Book for That

And . . . quiet independent reflection and rereads.

 Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback There's a Book for That

 Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback There's a Book for That

Our actual winners were as follows:

Same & Dave Dig a Hole took the medal. We awarded honor status to The Farmer and the Clown, Quest and Draw!

 Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback There's a Book for That

These titles received a LOT of love. Like the biggest smile of approval EVER! :-)

 Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback There's a Book for That

And student created stickers . . .

 Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback There's a Book for That

Titles that didn’t receive medal/honor status got another kind of love and devotion:

 Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback There's a Book for That

And when author/illustrators communicated with us via twitter, it was pretty magical!

 Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback There's a Book for That

Comments about favourite titles ranged from favourite parts to insightful observations. Some highlights:

Same & Dave Dig a Hole

“I like the part when they always pass by the big diamonds. Maybe they are too lazy to dig for a long time.”

“I really like when they dig straight down but they miss the pink diamond. The book had very good details. It’s like Sam and Dave fell in a new galaxy. Or like time travel.”

“I love how the dog could smell the diamond.”

“Sam and Dave is a great digging book because the dog can smell gems: one small, two medium three big, four enormous!!”

“That was the biggest diamond that I ever seen in a book!”

Draw!

“I like it because it is wordless. I love wordless books. I think he likes adventures and to do new things.”

“It has great illustrations and so much imaginations! We do lots of imaginations in our class.”

The Farmer and the Clown

“My favourite part is the friendship between the farmer and the clown.”

“My favourite part is when the clown washes his face and then he looks like a cute little baby.”

“My favourite part was when the clown needed to go and the farmer switched hats with him. It showed that on the next page.”

Quest

“This book is awesome! It has so many colours. I like how they draw something and then it comes true.”

“I choose Quest because the illustrations goes with the book. It’s a continuation of the book Journey and this time, they’re working together.”

The Girl and the Bicycle

“My favourite part is when the girl buyed the bicycle for her brother. I like when the girl dropped her bike and hugged the old lady.”

The Right Word

“I really like how the illustrator uses a lot of collage and nothing gets wasted.”

Sparky!

“Sparky was so lazy. He only knew how to sleep. He was an odd pet.”

“All the pictures are about cute and lazy. The pictures really fit with the plot. Sparky is very cute. I like how Sparky is always sleeping. The girl plays games but Sparky always loses.”

“I like the part when the sloth just sat there.”

The Promise

“I wouldn’t appreciate the colours in the ending as much if it didn’t have those dull colours to compare the bright colours to. It was a very good story.”

Reflecting on our learning was taken as seriously as exploring book details.

 Celebration: Mock Caldecott Results and Feedback There's a Book for That

I asked students to think about three questions. I shared some of their answers under each question.

What did you like about our Mock Caldecott process?

  • Some of the books kept me thinking
  • We got to vote on our favourite books (it’s very hard).
  • I like when we looked at the details
  • It is like a treasure hunt with books!
  • We noticed amazing things!
  • How we got to be judges and that is awesome.
  • I liked listening to all of the stories.
  • I get to rate all of the books!
  • We got to see new books that we haven’t seen before.
  • That we got to be learners and thinkers. I hope we do it again.

What did you learn about your own likes/dislikes/preferences with picture books?

  • I used to like books that were only black white but Quest made me change my mind.
  • I like when there’s a happy ending.
  • I like when they surprise us.
  • I like when there are muted colours and then the next page everything is bright.
  • You can learn a lot with just one picture book.
  • I used to dislike wordless books. Now, I like wordless books.
  • I like bright picture books more than plain picture books.

What did you learn about illustration and illustration styles?

  • Some books – you have to notice the small details.
  • Some illustrators do spotlights of do a small picture and leave a big white page
  • The illustrations have to fit with the plot.
  • They are very creative in books. They do that so kids will think about it.

My favourite response might be this one: “I noticed that all the kids had fun!” this is my celebration – the joy the Mock Caldecott process brought to our room. We are, more than ever, a reading community.

celebrate-link-up

Thank you to Ruth Ayres and the #celebratelu community! Being part of a community that regularly shares gratitude and celebrations truly transforms my weeks. Read all of the celebrations by following the links shared here.

 

The Mock Sibert 2015 Award Winner

Mock Sibert The Mock Sibert 2015 Award Winner

We are days away from learning which nonfiction book will be awarded the actual Sibert Award for 2015 but today is the day where we learn – here, on Kid Lit Fenzy and on Unleashing Readers which title won our Mock Sibert Award!

And . . .

THE WINNER IS . . . .

 The Right Word The Mock Sibert 2015 Award Winner

The Right Word: Roget and his Thesaurus written by Jen Bryant and illustrated by Melissa Sweet. Such a spectacular choice!

Now we must wait until Monday to find out if the Sibert committee agrees.

We are also happy to announce our giveaway winner. Congratulations to Cathy Ballou Mealey who has chosen Handle with Care: An Unusual Butterfly Journey written by Loree Griffin Burns with photographs by Ellen Harasimowicz  (one of our Mock Sibert titles) as her prize.

It was so much fun discussing and celebrating the fantastic nonfiction titles of 2014 with Alyson and Kellee. Hosting the Mock Sibert allowed us to highlight our favourites. Check out our original Mock Sibert choices here if you missed them:

On Kid Lit Frenzy

On There’s a Book for That

On Unleashing Readers

Thank you to all who participated! We cannot wait to see who wins on Monday!

Monday January 26th, 2015

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

I have been sharing a reading photo of the week each week. This week with all of the buzz of #MockCaldecott, I had many to choose from. But this photo of these two boys quietly reading is my favourite. It captures what happens when there are a few free moments in our class – students grab books and read. Choices and habits that are simple, sure, solid. Love.

For a peek at some related #booklove attached to our  #MockCaldecott, head over to my classroom blog and read about our guessing of title #3 in Aaron Becker‘s trilogy: Journey, Quest , . . . .? 

Monday January 26th, 2015 #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

imwayr

Favourites of the week:

A Perfectly Messed Up Story by Patrick McDonnell

There are many things I adore about this little title. The value it places on books. It’s philosophical musings. The coffee rings. The wit. Lovely, lovely, lovely!

A Perfectly Messed up Story Monday January 26th, 2015 #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

Stormy Night by Salina Yoon

Sweet through and through. A stormy night and a brave little bear (with the help of his family) handles the noises of a storm.

Stormy Night Monday January 26th, 2015 #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

Jonathan & Martha by Petr Horácek 

Playful and fun with lift up parts, cut outs and worms that battle into a tied up companionship, this books has huge potential for our buddy reading collection.

Jonathan & Martha Monday January 26th, 2015 #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

Elizabeth, Queen of the Seas written by Lynn Cox and illustrated by Brian Floca 

What a story! An elephant seal that felt at home in a river in Christchurch New Zealand. When the well meaning townspeople bring her out to the ocean where they assume she will be safer and more content, she manages to return time after time.

Elizabeth-Queen-of-the-Seas- Monday January 26th, 2015 #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

Maudie and Bear written by Jan Ormerod and illustrated by Freya Blackwood

Anything Freya Blackwood and I am a little in love. Interesting reactions to this title. Our little Maudie is full of spunk, personality and . . . .but bear is calm, solid and consistent. Full of patience and love. Would be interesting to talk with children about what they think about the interactions. I think Maudie actually represents many little ones who are quite focussed on self.

Maudie and Bear Monday January 26th, 2015 #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

I also finished (book #4 from my #MustReadin2015 list) The Sky is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson

Lots of love. Lots of pain. Grief and mourning muddled up with falling in love and living. Some stop you in your tracks images and lines. Wow.

The Sky is Everywhere Monday January 26th, 2015 #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

Up next? I finished reading Twerp by Mark Goldblatt to my children as our family read aloud. I highly recommend this title if you haven’t read it. It would make an ideal middle school read aloud (Grade 6 and up I think) Tonight we started reading The Shadowhand Covenant (Book Two of the Vengekeep Prophecies) by Brian Farrey

I am reading The Crossover by Kwame Alexander

Updates on my 2015 Reading Goals:

2015 Chapter Book Challenge: 5/80 complete

Goodreads Challenge: 32/415 books read

#MustReadin2015: 4/24 complete

Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge: 5/100 titles

Diverse Books in 2015: 2/50 books read

 

Celebration: Starts with the letter R

celebrate-link-up

Over on my class blog, Curiosity Racers, I shared what happened as a result of this tweet from author Aaron Becker.

It is worth checking out.

Really!

All of those delicious R words have inspired my celebration post today.

I celebrate:

REWARD

My children had a Professional Day on Monday so they came to my classroom with me. This was a wonderful experience all around. They were great helpers and my students loved to interact with them. All my most precious children in one room! Watching the students share their love of books with my children who have been raised on books was a most rewarding experience.

Celebration: Starts with the letter R There's a Book for That

RESTLESS

I love the restless energy of science experiments. Our favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteers came in on Thursday morning and led the students through some activities to learn about density. The excitement, the observing, the predicting, the confirming, the “Oh I get it now!” moments.

Celebration: Starts with the letter R There's a Book for That

RISK

In math, we are solving a variety of multi-step word problems involving multiplication and division. I have been modelling different choices around using manipulatives or 100 dot array charts to represent the thinking. Students have been working together to solve and write equations that represent their process. I love the confidence, the starting over, the talk, the thinking.

Celebration: Starts with the letter R There's a Book for That

REVEAL

Yes, the results of our #MockCaldecott are in! The winners are . . .

I hope to be posting more about this soon!

Celebration: Starts with the letter R There's a Book for That

RAGE

We have some very passionate readers in our room. When this title by Mark Pett wasn’t one of the winners (it was so very close!), one super fan gave it its own medal!

Celebration: Starts with the letter R There's a Book for That

And author/illustrator Mark Pett approved :-)

RAVE

There was lots of gushing over favourite titles in this #MockCaldecott process. Everyone had a chance to write about the books they loved and why. Oh, the book love! Celebration: Starts with the letter R There's a Book for That Thank you to Ruth Ayres and the #celebratelu community! Being part of a community that regularly shares gratitude and celebrations truly transforms my weeks. Read all of the celebrations by following the links shared here.

 

Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why?

This week, instead of profiling any of my recent nonfiction reading or highlighting a book, I decided to share the responses in my Grade 3/4 classroom when I asked this question:

“Look around our classroom library. What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why?”

This was a very useful exercise. In about 20 minutes, I learned a lot. Which books are popular? What topics are students interested in? How are book choices being made?

It also helped me to think about things like:

  • student purposes for reading
  • books to book talk
  • our nonfiction library (organization, display, etc.)
  • future book purchases
  • exposure to specific genres

There are many nonfiction titles in our classroom – both books that I read aloud and titles that the students choose to read independently that are kept in our nonfiction bins. These titles below were chosen from the bins.

Answers under each photo answer the question: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why?

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

“I’ve read all of the books in this series. When you book talked this one today, I wanted to read it because I like all of these creepy creatures.”

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

“It looks interesting from the cover. I want to know more about which animals hibernate. I don’t think I know them all.”

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

“I want to know what all of these feet are. I like the cover.”

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

“I like gorillas. They are really cute. And after we read about Ivan, I want to know more.”

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

“I want to know more about how animals might get dehydrated and how to save animals. The cover has a really great close up photo.”

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

I like baby animals a lot. They’re so cute. I’ve read this series before. I like all of the photographs and that it tells me more about animals.”

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

 “I want to learn about dirt. The picture looks like it shows what’s inside of it.”

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

“I want to know more about pandas. I know this series and I like the photos.”

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

“Because I’m scared of crickets. If I read it, I’ll get used to crickets. I read this series before and I like it because it’s easy to read and it tells about the life cycle and stuff.”

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

I think it’s going to show lots of details about sharks. I know some things about a tiger shark already.”

Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

 “I love this series. I like reading about the animals that I don’t know lots of things about. Yet.” 

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

 “I like the photographs and the close up pictures. I want to learn more about mantises.”

 

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: What nonfiction title do you want to read next & why? There's a Book for That

“I want to find out more about how different animals eat. I like this photo on the cover a lot.”

A few themes seemed to emerge in terms of book choices:

Students were choosing to read books that might

  • help them to answer specific questions
  • be similar to other books they had read and enjoyed (similar series, author, topic)
  • have connections to their background knowledge
  • have connections to other learning we have done during the year
  • be like a book they have had success with in the past

Some choices are being made purely based on the cover. Engaging full colour photographs are appealing. Other choices have more to do with a sense of the inside content. Students are also choosing books that will be a good fit in terms of reading level. A wide variety of texts at different difficulty levelss in essential. Series in nonfiction are popular just like series in fiction.

What books do your students gravitate to? What trends do you notice?

And, now I am thinking/confirming . . .

  • Book talk. Book talk. Book talk. Lots of exposure to what we know and love and new titles, genres, topics.
  • Make sure I know student interest. I need to keep asking these questions about preferences and picks. It will help me with supporting a variety of book choices and topics for future read alouds.
  • The more I read aloud from the extensive nonfiction collection I have amassed, the more wonder, curiosity and knowledge I will help build. This will lead students to a wider variety of book choices for independent reading.

How I love nonfiction picture books! Thanks to Alyson from Kid Lit Frenzy for the inspiration to read and share more nonfiction picture books in 2015. Follow the link to Alyson’s blog to read about more nonfiction books you need to read!

Thanks also to Alyson for all of the wonderful conversations about nonfiction reading and teaching with nonfiction books. A conversation with her inspired me to start thinking about what draws my students to certain books. I am so very glad that I asked this question this week.

#nfpb2015

Monday January 19th, 2015

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

I have been sharing a reading photo of the week each week. This week, the photo I love best was taken during Reading Workshop on Friday. Everyone was so excited to get down to reading. These girls all settled on the carpet reading various comics and picture books. Two girls are engaged in an animated discussion about Sam & Dave Dig a Big Hole. Lots of books. Lots of book love.

Monday January 19th, 2015  #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

imwayr

Favourites of the week:

Are You Awake? by Sophie Blackall

This book is all about adorable little child questions that happen when there should be sleeping. From the Mom’s perspective, oh dear, go to sleep little one. From the reader’s point of view? Pure delight. And I adore Sophie Blackall‘s work, so = extra great!

Are you awake? Monday January 19th, 2015  #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

The Camel in the Sun written by Griffin Ondaatje and illustrated by Linda Wolfsgruber 

Not sure where to begin with this book. Such an emotional and serious read. A beautiful book all around. Themes of kindness, compassion and empathy. More suited for older readers/listeners. Although, in an interactive read aloud, younger listeners could manage it. A fable of sorts.

Camel in the Sun Monday January 19th, 2015  #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

Gus & Me The Story of My Grandad and my First Guitar written by Keith Richards and illustrated by Theodora Richards 

I was seriously skeptical with this one. Musician writes a children book . . . and his daughter illustrates it . . . ? But, actually, this was a lovely title. The text was well done. I really liked some of the illustrations – especially the guitar atop the piano page. And, it has so many elements I love in a picture book – a relationship between generations, family connections, special memories. Well done, Mr. Richards.

Gus & Me Monday January 19th, 2015  #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

Priscilla and the Hollyhocks written by Anne Broyles and illustrated by Anna Alter 

This is the story of Priscilla, a young slave, who is sold to a Cherokee family and then must walk with them along the “Trail of Tears” when they are relocated. Hollyhock flowers represent a link to her childhood memories of family and her mother. An important historical read.

Priscilla-and-the-Hollyhocks- Monday January 19th, 2015  #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

My Blue is Happy written by Jessica Young and illustrated by Catia Chien

This book almost leaps about shouting, “Don’t you want to use me for a writing activity prompt? You do, don’t you?” Yep, yes I do! I fell quickly for this book exploring the emotions of colour, asking us to look at typical colour feelings from another perspective. And, wow, Catia Chien is impressing me at every turn. Gorgeous illustrations.

My Blue is Happy Monday January 19th, 2015  #IMWAYR There's a Book for That

I also read two novels:

How to Outrun a Crocodile When Your Shoes are Untied by Jess Keating

Captures the intensity of this middle school age – the navigating the social world, the figuring out of who one is with lots of humour, surprises, embarrassment and joy. As my daughter, who happens to be 12, and have a twin brother, said “this book is so real.” Ana is a character you will want to keep reading.I will definitely be picking up Jess Keating’s next novel and soon!

How to Outrun a Crocodile when Your Shoes are Untied

Going Over by Beth Kephart 

I am not sure if this book spoke to me so intensely because I have read so much literature set in Central/Eastern Europe. Or because I lived in what was once Czechoslovakia from 1990 to 1992 just after the wall went down in a small town that really was slow to “westernize”and shake off Communist influences. All of that is part of it. A lot of it is that Kephart is so ridiculously talented. This is a story and a piece of art. I can see reading this book over and over because it is so very, very rich in imagery and emotion. It is painful. It is beautiful. It is haunting. Loved this book. And I haven’t even touched the plot. Just go. Find it. Read it. Let the images swirl about. Be with these characters. Fall into this time. What an experience.

Going Over_FC

Next up? Reading another title from my #MustReadin2015 list The Sky is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson

2015 Reading Goals:

2015 Chapter Book Challenge: 4/80 complete

Goodreads Challenge: 26/415 books read

#MustReadin2015: 3/24 complete

Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge: 4/100 titles

Diverse Books in 2015: 2/50 books read

 

Celebration: Monday leads to Friday

celebrate-link-up

On some Mondays, I question whether I have it together at all. A lot seems to not be yet “in synch” and the previous week feels very long ago. Monday often feels like a warm up, remind ourselves, get it together day. I don’t often say TGIF. But I often think TGMIO. TGMIO = Thank Goodness Monday is Over. Monday is the day when we don’t have the cushion of success immediately behind us. Anxiety is higher. Stamina is lower. Energy is inconsistent. When Monday is under our belt, it’s like the clouds part. The sun creeps in or sometimes it lights up the week bright and strong on Tuesday and holds fast.

That was this week. Monday was a yikes kind of day. Tuesday started a torrent of amazing and I celebrate Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and all of their glory!

A few highlights:

Reading books for our Mock Caldecott competition has been pure joy. Students are so engaged with this! I hear them chatting to each other, “Do you have a top three?” “So now which ones are your favourites?” ” I know my favourites but there are too many of them.” “Oh . . . how are we going to decide?”

Reading Sam & Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Jon Klassen was a particularly special experience. We read it last thing Tuesday afternoon. I got to share it with a room of children and four adults (including my parents who volunteer on Tuesdays!) I loved listening to the children’s comments. Even more amusing might have been watching the other adults listen to these comments. I covered the pages in sticky notes – recording all of the utterances. I knew that reading this book aloud to this group of kids was going to be pretty fantastic. It totally surpassed my expectations.

Celebration: Monday leads to Friday There's a Book for That

I celebrate math problem solving and the beautiful mess it creates! On Friday, we were all so lost in our work, we didn’t pay attention to the time. When it was time for library, I just had them all stand up, line up and go. We could clean up later. “Walk away from the math,” I had to prompt. They were so engaged! When the students left (it was my prep) I snapped a picture. I loved the piles of manipulatives, the wipe off boards in use, the way notebooks were pushed together as little groups or pairs had formed to work together. We are mathematicians! We share ideas. We talk. We learn from each other. We take risks. This photo of the “post” math work period, reveals just that. It makes me smile.

Celebration: Monday leads to Friday There's a Book for That

Even though my students are reading nonfiction titles right from September, I always do a big nonfiction launch in Reading Workshop starting in January. We have more guided instruction, more nonfiction book talks than usual, frequent mini-lessons, some nonfiction group activities, etc. Day one was so much fun. I simply put out the baskets everywhere around the room and give the children some recording sheets and send them off to be Fact DetectivesAs they begin looking through books and recording, I am walking around noticing. What books do they gravitate to? Who remembers how to use the features to help them better navigate the texts? Do my new students feel comfortable locating and recording information? It’s noisy. It’s energized. It sets the tone for much more to come.

I love this photo below – she shouted out, “Holy Bagumba! Look how big this boat is!” (Yes, we did just read Flora & Ulysses!)

Celebration: Monday leads to Friday There's a Book for That

As I walked around the room, children were sharing. Not just facts – but their thinking, reactions and questions. With me and with each other.

Celebration: Monday leads to Friday There's a Book for That

There were impromptu fact announcements. Kids would jump up and tell anyone who might be listening, “Listen to this . . . ” “Did you know . . . ?” The best thing? We were listening! “Really? Whoa . . .” “Can I read that book next?” “Ms. Gelson do you have more books about . . .?” 

Celebration: Monday leads to Friday There's a Book for That

And, the excitement continued. The next day in Reading Workshop when everyone was engaged in independent reading, many children pulled nonfiction titles out of their book boxes and continued to read. The little guy below told me: “This book make me fainting.” When I asked him to tell me more, he shared a bunch of “wow” facts and just shook his head as if to say, “I never would have imagined . . . ”

Celebration: Monday leads to Friday There's a Book for That

And again I am celebrating the yoga in our room. It represents community. Focus. Space. Recharging. The children crave it. And thanks to the amazing Miriam who works with me, we are finding time throughout the week to practice.

IMG_0487

Thank you to Ruth Ayres and the #celebratelu community! Being part of a community that regularly shares gratitude and celebrations truly transforms my weeks. Read all of the celebrations by following the links shared here.