Monday August 31st, 2015

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

I have been sharing a reading photo of the week each week. Now that it is summer, I am not surrounded every day with little readers so . . . I am choosing moments from the year not previously shared. I love this Henry and Mudge love!

From the classroom 2014/2015 archives:

Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

imwayr

On the blog:

For Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful male/female friendships in MG literature

Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A Room Full of Nonfiction A mini tour of the nonfiction in my classroom

A Celebration post about #booklove starring The Good Little Book

Sunday Reflections: Literary Nest Building 101

Books I read and loved:

A Rock Can Be . . . by Laura Purdie Salas with illustrations by Violeta Dabija

I love this nonfiction series – lovely poetry, stunning illustrations and interesting and detailed back matter. A must have for classrooms and/or libraries.

A Rock Can Be Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

What this Story Needs is a Pig in a Wig by Emma J. Virján

Super silly. Super simple. Perfect for kids just learning to read – lots of repetition – a quality little book.

What this Story Needs is a Pig in a Wig Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

The Good Little Book written by Kyo Maclear and illustrated by Marian Arbona

I adore this book on many different levels. What a perfect book to get us thinking about heading back into classrooms! The end pages are incredible!

 The Good Little Book Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

To the Sea by Cale Atkinson

Love the tones in this sweet little book about friendship and being noticed.

To the Sea Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Ask Me written by Bernard Waber and illustrated by Suzy Lee

I actually hugged this book in the bookstore after I read it. A regular conversation between a father and his young daughter perfectly captures the energy and wonder of a particular time of childhood. Love this book! And the illustrations, wow!

Ask Me Bernard Waber Suzy Lee Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Boats for Papa by Jessixa Bagley

Yes, Josh Funk if you are reading this, this book made me teary. A book about the every day moving on process of grieving the loss of a loved one and wrapping yourself up in the love of those still with you. Just beautiful.

Boats for Papa Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Leo a Ghost Story written by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Christian Robinson

Leo is a charmer. A ghost that needs to find out where he is appreciated.

Leo a Ghost Story Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Bug in a Vacuum by Mélanie Watt

So clever Ms. Watt! This is one thick picture book – full of the stages of grief (hilariously conveyed) and lots of humour. Just delightful. Can see using this with older grades and having students write about their own self-talk through the stages of grief attached to a particular event.

Bug in a Vacuum Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Blue on Blue written by Dianne White and illustrated by Beth Krommes

Rain, beautiful rain. This book celebrates the dark colours and images of a rain storm. The illustrations are incredible.

 Blue on Blue Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

The Tea Party in the Woods by Akiko Miyakoshi

This is a wonderful title. Such creative twists on Little Red Riding Hood – crafted into quite a different tale. Love the shades and repetitive colours.

 The Tea Party in the Woods Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Leroy Ninker Saddles Up written by Kate DiCamillo and illustrated by Chris Van Dusen

I read this to myself and had to whisper certain lines aloud because I was certain they would be a treat to say. Yep! Wow Kate DiCamillo can write!

Leroy Ninker Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Survival Strategies of the Almost Brave by Jen White

An emotional middle grade novel about two sisters who need to take care of each other when their Dad leaves them at a gas station. I couldn’t put this book down.

Survival Strategies of the Almost Brave Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Death by Toilet Paper by Donna Gephart

From the title and the cover, one would think this is a light hearted novel. There is humour but it is full of emotions. In fact, I woke up early one morning worried about the character and had to finish the book to make sure all was okay. What do you do when you are twelve, you have lost your Dad and money is an issue? This title explores this reality in creative, but always authentic and sensitive ways. Fantastic characters and family dynamics.

Death  by Toilet Paper Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

I read this in one sitting and if I had time, I would have started on page one and read it all over again. So beautiful. So heartfelt. So human.

the house on mango street Monday August 31st, 2015 There's a Book for That

Updates on my 2015 Reading Goals:

2015 Chapter Book Challenge: 50/80 complete

Goodreads Challenge: 309/415 books read

#MustReadin2015: 16/24 complete

Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge: 58/100 titles

Diverse Books in 2015: 33/50 books read

Up next? I am still reading and LOVING  The Queen of Water by Laura Resau and then will begin Read Between the Lines by Jo Knowles

Literary Nest Building 101

When I said the final goodbyes to my students in June, it was goodbye to a group of children I have shared a classroom with for two or three years. A reading community with a culture of reading that was well established. At 2:30 p.m. on our last day of school, what were we doing? Reading! Books connected us and enriched our lives.

We had the reading groove going on. There was back and forth trust with our recommendations. We breathed in deep as we settled into read alouds. We communicated with wide eyes, arched eyebrows and raised shoulders as we listened. We craved daily independent reading time.  We were readers.

Literary Nest Building 101 How to build a culture of reading There's a Book for That

These children were discerning when it came to new books. They were as apt to gush ” I LOVE that book,” as to comment “Well, it was mostly good but . . ” We knew certain books would be loved by some and other books would be treasured by all. I chose what I shared carefully. Generally, I delivered amazing choices because what I shared was based on the recommendations of a wise, appreciated group of book lovers (yes, I am talking to you Nerdy Book Club members) who want to deliver the best on the page to the children in their charge. Best for the best.

But this fall, I will have a brand new group of students. A younger group with fresh interests and experiences. My challenge? To win them over to the land of reading.

The impatient part of me wants to do this instantaneously. Let’s fall in love at first sight and embark on our journey together as book lovers. But I have learned. The 9 and 10 year olds I sent off surrounded in words, images and book love were 7 and 8 year olds two years ago. I began then at the beginning. I remember when they first arrived, things felt slightly off kilter. I bemoaned that I couldn’t dive deep into heavy, heady picture books and richly written novels. I had to begin differently. Start where they were. I learned that when you find the right match – the right books for the readers in front of you, the reading experience becomes instantly rich. Thankfully, I learned this quickly and we began to discover new books to love together.

Now, a few years later, I need to dust off my patient self and approach this new group with more experience, deeper commitment and careful and best intentions. I want to do it right. Wrap them in book love and let them settle. Not squeeze too tight. Let the books do their thing. Build a literary nest in which to nurture these new readers. When we fly, we will soar. But first there is going to be a little bit of bumbling about. Some falls. Some reading journeys that need more lift off. The right wind. Smoother landings. We will get there. One book at a time. Shared together. Shared between us. The love of reading doesn’t need to be found. It just sometimes needs to be switched on. The stories, the connection, the communication, the sharing; reading brings all of these things to a community.

Literary Nest Building 101 How to build a culture of reading There's a Book for That

What is my plan? To keep certain things in mind. Patience. Humour. Celebration. I will read daily and often. I will reveal the huge part of me that is a book lover. A brazen book lover who shares books in big, booming, leap about ways but who is also a sharer of stories and lets there be silence, pauses and time to absorb.

I will be deliberate.

We will be book explorers. We will learn how to navigate each and every part of a book. The end pages, the pattern on the spine and the under the jacket surprises. We will read every name: the author, the illustrator and the dedications. Books have little secrets. There are mysteries tucked away in all kinds of places if you look carefully.

We will laugh and giggle. Through humorous books we will begin associating reading with fun and joy. We will become quickly addicted. The power of a funny story with little readers can never be underestimated.

We will honour visual literacy. Through wordless titles we will participate in “tell alouds.” We will learn that experiencing a story doesn’t have to involve reading a single word. For beginning readers, this is all powerful.

We will create shared experiences and chances to share. Guest readers will be invited in. We will write and post book reviews. We will connect with authors and illustrators. We will give the gift of reading to our kindergarten buddies.

Literary Nest Building 101 How to build a culture of reading There's a Book for That

We will let nonfiction books tease out questions, awe and first ever discoveries. We will put down the books and talk and wonder together. In various ways, we will try to catch all of the new knowledge that happens in the room

I will read books that will make them mad. Books that make them sad. Joyous. Safe. Confused. I will honour the feelings. We will sit with these emotions together quietly. Or we will rage and shout. All of our reactions will be accepted and allow us to make our worlds bigger.

We will find books where they can find themselves. Other books will introduce them to lives and people they have never imagined.

We will develop listening stamina through reading chapter books. We will get lost in the characters. We will feel stories deeply and fully. We will let our thinking be transformed.

In our classroom, we will have time to read, time to talk and time to read aloud.

I will watch the impact of certain titles on certain readers. When I pay attention, I will be better equipped to find the right books for the right readers and make sure that every reader has many books to love.

All of this won’t happen week one.

Maybe not even month one.

But I will know the moment it does.

My tightly woven nest won’t be empty. But it will no longer be the place where I gather children and ready them for reading journeys. It will, instead, start to expand and grow, becoming the place where readers land and take flight.

 

Because Good Little Books Must be Shared; celebrating books about #booklove

This week a treasure of a book arrived at my house.

The Good Little Book written by Kyo Maclear and illustrated by Marian Arbona

 The Good Little Book Because Good Little Books Must be Shared; celebrating books about #booklove There's a Book for That

This title perfectly captures true #booklove and the notion that books must be shared. What a perfect book to get us thinking about heading back into classrooms and reading to children or snuggling up for a cozy family story time with your own little ones. Books about loving books are especially special. They celebrate the wonder and magic of reading. This title by Maclear reminds us that our attachments to certain stories can be passionate and run deep.

This book is unique. It doesn’t have a jacket (significant later in the story) and its end pages are some of the most exquisite I have ever seen. Vibrant red flowers, quirky doodles and a name plate that makes us think about a very important question: Does a book truly belong to any one person? 

This book is about a boy and his book. His love for the book grows slowly. It comforts him. It transports him to new places and inspires him to experience a myriad of emotions. Soon, he is most definitely attached. And then one day, his book is missing. He worries. He searches. He mourns.

It might be that he does come across this book again. But our boy is now a reader and he knows, most certainly, that a book is a gift. A gift to be shared.

Such a gem. This good little book :-)

This week I celebrate The Good Little Book and all of the #booklove it will conjure up in its readers.

I have also shared some of my other favourite titles that honour books, literacy and reading.

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore by William Joyce

 The Fantasict Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore  Because Good Little Books Must be Shared; celebrating books about #booklove There's a Book for That

The Library written by Sarah Stewart and illustrated by David Small

 The Library  Because Good Little Books Must be Shared; celebrating books about #booklove There's a Book for That

That Book Woman written by Heather Henson and illustrated by David Small

 That Book Woman  Because Good Little Books Must be Shared; celebrating books about #booklove There's a Book for That

Mr. George Baker written by Amy Hest and illustrated by Jon J Muth

Mr. George Baker  Because Good Little Books Must be Shared; celebrating books about #booklove There's a Book for That

The Snatchabook written by Helen Docherty and illustrated by Thomas Docherty.

The Snatchabook  Because Good Little Books Must be Shared; celebrating books about #booklove There's a Book for That

The Bee Tree by Patricia Polacco

 The Bee Tree  Because Good Little Books Must be Shared; celebrating books about #booklove There's a Book for That

The Best Book in the World by Rilla 

the best book in the world  Because Good Little Books Must be Shared; celebrating books about #booklove There's a Book for That

Thank you to Ruth Ayres and the #celebratelu community! Being part of a community that regularly shares gratitude and celebrations truly transforms my weeks.

celebrate-link-up

Happy Reading! 

Thank you to Pamela at Penguin Random House Canada for providing the copy of The Good Little Book for review!

Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction

I have written many times about how important I think it is to have students to have books in their environment – books that they can interact with, books to read, books that are read to them and books to look at from across the room and think, “Hmm, I’d really like to read that!”

Nonfiction titles are especially wonderful because they spark curiosity, are the perfect thing to enhance and inspire learning on various topics and can be picked up and put down when there are a few minutes here and there to read.

I decided to do a little bit of a nonfiction book tour of my room and sneak in a few favourite titles here and there. Nonfiction books everywhere you look!

For starters, I have a vast personal collection of titles that I read aloud, pull out when we are studying specific topics and use for reference texts to support certain students who have specific questions about their world.

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

There are four bins of books here like this one below :-) I have organized these by theme for easy access (like Ecology, Mammals, Science Concepts, Water, etc)

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

A few favourites that I have recently added to these bins:

Water is Water written by Miranda Paul and illustrated by Jason Chin

Water Is Water- A Book About the Water Cycle Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

Wandering Whale Sharks by Susumu Shingu

Wandering Whale Sharks Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

Weeds Find a Way written by Cindy Jenson-Elliott and illustrated by Carolyn Fisher

 Weeds Find a Way Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

In this same area I have a bin of picture book biographies.

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

I love to share biographies with my class. One title I plan to read early in the year is Emmanuel’s Dream: The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah written by Laurie Ann Thompson and illustrated by Sean Qualls

Emmanuel's Dream- The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah

On another book shelf I have other reference material – both nonfiction and fiction.

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

In the wonder/nature section are titles like these.

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

When we are in the full swing of things, the “recently read/booktalked nonfiction shelf” might look like this:

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

And always, climbing up our walls are book jackets and relevant vocabulary.

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

In one corner by the sinks is a bin of interesting fact and reference books that I change up every month or so. There is empty counter space here to open up the books and begin reading.

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

I just pulled some titles out of the nonfiction section of the library so that it reflects the reading and interest levels of the new students coming in – younger readers than last year. If I am wrong, I have some texts in bins ready to pull back out.

We have lots of nonfiction readers.

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

And a large collection of titles for independent and buddy reading

 Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

In some bins, dividers help students who are looking for a particular topic.

 Nonfiction in the Room There's a Book for That

Hugely popular series in these bins include:

Creepy Creatures titles by Valerie Bodden

Mites Creepy Creatures Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

The Grow with Me series

Grow with me Butterfly Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

Scholastic Discover More titles

Scholastic Discover More Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: A room full of nonfiction There's a Book for That

That was a mini tour of the nonfiction in my room. Where can nonfiction titles be found in your classroom/library?

Thanks to Alyson from Kid Lit Frenzy for the inspiration to read and share more nonfiction picture books in 2015. Follow the link to Alyson’s blog to read about more nonfiction books you need to read!

#nfpb2015

Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful friendships in MG literature

It’s time for Top Ten Tuesday, a meme created by The Broke and Bookish.

TTT

This week’s topic? Top Ten Books That Would Be On Your Syllabus If You Taught X 101

Friendships in MG Fiction 101 Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful friendships in MG literature There's a Book for That

I chose Friendships in MG Literature and focused in particular on friendships between male and female characters. Friendship dynamics are frequently explored in middle grade novels. Pre-teen and teen readers are all about looking outward, beginning to rely heavily on their peers and attempting to navigate the complexities of friendship dynamics. It’s developmental. It’s difficult. Mistakes are often made. What better way to develop a deeper understanding of friendships than in the pages of a book? I think these titles in particular feature wonderful relationships based on respect, acceptance, support and kindness. The friendships are not always perfect but these novels are perfectly suited to learning all about what it is to be a good friend.

Friendships worth reading about:

Chirp and Joey in Nest by Esther Erlich

Nest Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful friendships in MG literature There's a Book for That

Ivy and Paul in The Great Good Summer by Liz Garton Scanlon

The Great Good Summer Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful friendships in MG literature There's a Book for That

Albert and Ally in Fish in a Tree by Lynda Mullaly Hunt

Fish In A Tree Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful friendships in MG literature There's a Book for That

Felicity and Jonah in A Snicker of Magic by Natalie Lloyd

a snicker of magic Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful friendships in MG literature There's a Book for That

Circa and Miles in Circa Now by Amber McRee Turner

circa now Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful friendships in MG literature There's a Book for That

Peter and Annie in Wish Girl written by Nikki Loftin

Wish Girl Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful friendships in MG literature There's a Book for That

Apple and Evan in Blackbird Fly by Erin Entrada Kelly

Blackbird Fly Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful friendships in MG literature There's a Book for That

Will and Maren in The Boundless by Kenneth Oppel

The Boundless Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful friendships in MG literature There's a Book for That

 Mo and Dale in The Ghosts of Tupelo Landing by Sheila Turnage

Ghosts of Tupelo Landing Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful friendships in MG literature There's a Book for That

Sophie and Matteo in Rooftoppers by Katherine Rundell

Rooftoppers by Katherine Rundell Top Ten Tuesday: Titles that feature wonderful friendships in MG literature There's a Book for That

Can you think of another friendship pair that could be added to this list?

Monday August 24th, 2015

It’s Monday! What are you reading?

I have been sharing a reading photo of the week each week. Now that it is summer, I am not surrounded every day with little readers so . . . I am choosing moments from the year not previously shared. I love this sweet little peek into a buddy reading partnership.

From the classroom 2014/2015 archives:

Monday August 24th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Join Jen from Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki from Unleashing Readers and share all of the reading you have done over the week from picture books to young adult novels. Follow the links to read about all of the amazing books the #IMWAYR community has read. It’s the best way to discover what to read next.

imwayr

Less blogging and less reading this week. I was very busy working in my classroom library. I am hoping to share a few details in an upcoming post or two.

On the blog:

For Top Ten Tuesday: Ten plus Ten equals Twenty Auto-Buy Illustrators 

A Celebration post about clearing out paper from my classroom!

Books I read and loved:

Taan’s Moon A Haida Moon Story by Alison Gear with felt illustrations by Kiki van der Heiden with the children of Haida Gwaii

Such a beautiful book that is a wonderfully collaborative effort. Read here for more information about the process. In the Haida language Taan means bear. This is a story of Taan’s experience of the seasons. Just so lovely.

Taan's Moon Monday August 24th, 2015 There's a Book for That

A Bird Is a Bird by Lizzy Rockwell

The perfect nonfiction picture book for a story time with little ones or as a reference title for early primary students.

A Bird Is a Bird Monday August 24th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Spring Walk by Virginia Brimhall Snow

Spring flowers are my very favourite so I adored this title.

Spring-Walk Monday August 24th, 2015 There's a Book for That

When I was Born written by Isabel Monhós Martins and illustrated by Madalena Matosa (First published in Portuguese in 2007)

I love the vibrant colours and the interesting premise of this book. Thinking about the world experienced as a variety of new experiences. Treasured sensory collections.

“These are the smells I love:

the smell of my grandmother’s lao,

the smell of warm chicken soup,

the smell of paints in school . . . “

Perfect to inspire some of our own mindful writing.

When I was Born Monday August 24th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Bears Don’t Read! by Emma Chichester Clark 

Bears don’t read. But what if you were a bear and you found a book and you wanted to be able to read it? This is that story. Delightful!

Bears Don't Read Monday August 24th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

I liked this book in the beginning. Liked the characters. Liked the format. Liked it all around. But half way through it really grabbed me. I began to totally adore these characters. I couldn’t wait to find out what was going to happen. I finished it hours and hours ago and I already miss specific characters. Simon has a supportive family, wonderful friends and a “kind of” boyfriend he has not actually met. Oh and he’s not actually openly gay. Such a honest, vulnerable and charming novel.

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda Monday August 24th, 2015 There's a Book for That

Updates on my 2015 Reading Goals:

2015 Chapter Book Challenge: 47/80 complete

Goodreads Challenge: 294/415 books read

#MustReadin2015: 15/24 complete

Nonfiction Picture Book Challenge: 57/100 titles

Diverse Books in 2015: 32/50 books read

Up next? I am reading The Queen of Water by Laura Resau

Celebration: Half a Drawer in a File Cabinet

This week I am celebrating half a drawer in a file cabinet. What’s there is not as important as what’s not. Here is the photo of said drawer.

 Celebration: Half a Drawer There's a Book for That

These files (seen below from a different perspective) are all of the files I have at school. Just these. No others! Really!! Half the drawer is paper files. The other half contains 2 baskets of math related stuff for practice.

 Celebration: Half a Drawer There's a Book for That

What’s in these files? Strategy sheets and games. They are used and reused inside write on/wipe off sleeves that we use during math.

I love these sheets for many reasons. They are low risk, easy to use and fun for the students. For me, they mean less paper, less marking (I snap photos and record on information as I observe on checklists) and they eliminate the “I’m done,” phenomenon of a fixed page. One set of photocopies. Multiple years of use. We rarely (other than our notebooks) write on paper during math class.

 Celebration: Half a Drawer There's a Book for That

I also love them because they are useful. Well used. Supportive of learning. A way for students to represent their thinking.

But . . . I am getting away from what I am here to celebrate. I am celebrating that I have no other files. NONE. This is it. No files full of “I may one day need this” papers. No files of “I should keep this just in case” papers. So. Little. Paper. Hurrah!

These files are in a two drawer file cabinet that is turned sideways and used as my “desk” On the side I utilize the magnetic properties of the cabinet to post schedules and class lists/checklists. On top, my day plan. A basket of sticky notes. A jar of pens. And once the year begins, usually, a pile of books.

I do have some papers in a few other places before this looks strangely impossible.

Relevant student documents for current children in my room are kept in a binder. I also have 8 magazine boxes full of BLM sheets that I use frequently. For example, wonder webs, Fact/React sheets, recording sheets for various things in Reading Workshop, etc. I keep multiple copies so we have these on hand when we need them for a particular activity. School schedules are posted on the side of my file cabinet (hurrah for magnets) and information for a Teacher on Call is posted on the inside of a cabinet.

Right now I have no floating about papers that end up in my letter box and take much too long to deal with. It’s the beginning of the year. I have cleared a space for these on top of a cabinet and am hoping that I can deal with them in a timely manner so they don’t overwhelm me. Paper makes me crazy. I have heard in a few places that we are either “pilers or filers” (not sure where this originated). I am clearly a piler so files mean that I will put papers in a place and never find them again. My math center (half a drawer of files) will be different because I need these things throughout the year and it is only one filing system to keep on top of.

So, this week I celebrate this little half a drawer of files. I celebrate that I bravely recycled a bunch of other papers that I hadn’t looked at in years. I celebrate that I “get” my relationship with paper (only took 20 years of teaching!) and that I feel “paper free” and happy beginning this new school year.

Half a drawer in a file cabinet. My celebration of pared down paper. :-)

Anyone else out there with “pitching paper” stories? It’s beautifully freeing!

Thank you to Ruth Ayres and the #celebratelu community! Being part of a community that regularly shares gratitude and celebrations truly transforms my weeks.

celebrate-link-up