NFPB Wednesday: Tiny Creatures & Little Scientists

It is June. The end of June in fact. Literally, I can count the hours before we end our year. What am I thinking about those hours? How many more read alouds can I fit in? What should they be? How to choose . . . ? Sigh

So . . . last week when I knew our Let’s Talk Science volunteers were coming in one last time, I decided we needed a “science” theme day – the perfect chance to read more nonfiction books!

I asked my students a big question that morning: Why science? Why science education? Who wants to be a scientist? Their answers, as usual, were wonderful. They told me that scientists/science learners:

  • want to discover things
  • care about about people
  • have a passion/interest in science
  • want to solve theories
  • have lots of energy
  • are interested in facts/things they can prove
  • ask lots of questions

NFPB Wednesday: Tiny Creatures & Little Scientists There's a Book for That

We filled our day with science experiments, science themed yoga (thanks to the wonderful Miriam Tratt) and read alouds about science including . . .

Tiny Creatures The World of Microbes by Nicola Davies; illustrated by Emily Sutton (Candlewick Press 2014)

 Tiny Creatures NFPB Wednesday: Tiny Creatures & Little Scientists There's a Book for That

I could rave on and on about how this book is so very ideal for young learners – making a huge and seemingly confusing subject, manageable and meaningful. But . . . I will let my students do the raving. Their reactions and messages to Nicola Davies:

“How are you such a great author? You taught us about microbes and made it fun, not boring!”

“How did it pop into your head to write about microbes?”

“Thank you for making this all easy to understand!”

“It makes my mind explode with ideas.”

“I really want to wash my hands now.”

“Can you make a book about what an atom is made of please?”

The mark of a great nonfiction title for me is all about the engagement, the wonder, the questions and the “settling in” of understanding. This book had my students completely fascinated. After school one boy found me in the library. He had run back to school to show me the word “microbe” in the novel he was reading.

“And now I know what it’s talking about!”

I am such a fan of the nonfiction picture book read aloud!

Thanks to Alyson from Kid Lit Frenzy for the inspiration to read and share more nonfiction picture books in 2015. Follow the link to Alyson’s blog to read about more nonfiction books you need to read!

#nfpb2015

12 thoughts on “NFPB Wednesday: Tiny Creatures & Little Scientists

  1. I’m a new follower of your blog and wanted to tell u how much I enjoy your posts! What happens in the summer? Do u keep blogging, I hope?

  2. Reblogged this on The Best of It and commented:
    Soexcited about this post, as I prepare for my Woods to Words summer camp in just a couple of weeks! We’ll definitely be talking about what a scientist is, too. Thanks for sharing!

  3. We love Tiny Creatures – It is amazing the way Nicola Davies explains such a complicated topic. We want to use this book as a mentor text during an informational writing unit of study.

  4. The mark of a great nonfiction title for me is all about the engagement, the wonder, the questions and the “settling in” of understanding. This is a favorite quote from the post. You do such great things in your classroom Carrie.

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